Now showing items 1-5 of 19

  • A 250-year periodicity in Southern Hemisphere westerly winds over the last 2600 years

    Turney, Chiris S.M.; Jones, Richard T.; Fogwill, Christopher J.; Hatton J.; Williams, A.N.; Hogg, Alan G.; Thomas, Zoë; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Mooney, S; Reimer, Ron W (European Geosciences Union (EGU), 2016)
    Middle Holocene cultures have been widely studied around the Eastern-Mediterranean basin in the last 30 years and past cultural activities have been commonly linked with regional climate changes. However, in many cases ...
  • Bayesian evaluation of the southern hemisphere radiocarbon offset during the holocene

    Hogg, Alan G.; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Turney, Chris S.M.; Palmer, Jonathan G. (Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona, 2009)
    While an interhemispheric offset in atmospheric radiocarbon levels from AD 1950–950 is now well established, its existence earlier in the Holocene is less clear, with some studies reporting globally uniform 14C levels while ...
  • Calibration of the radiocarbon time scale for the southern hemisphere: AD 1850-950.

    McCormac, F.G.; Reimer, Paula J.; Hogg, Alan G.; Higham, Thomas F.G.; Baillie, Mike G.L.; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Stuiver, M. (University of Arizona, 2002)
    We have conducted a series of radiocarbon measurements on decadal samples of dendrochronologically dated wood from both hemispheres, spanning 1000 years (McCormac et al. 1998; Hogg et al. this issue). Using the data presented ...
  • Dusty horizons

    Lowe, David J.; Tonkin, Philip J.; Palmer, Alan S.; Palmer, Jonathan G. (Geological Society of New Zealand in association with GNS Science, 2008)
    Dust whipped up and deposited by wind forms sheets of loess, which drape over the land. These loess deposits and the soils formed within them yield insights into past climatic and environmental change.
  • Dusty horizons

    Lowe, David J.; Tonkin, Philip J.; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Lanigan, Kerri Miriam; Palmer, Alan S. (Geoscience Society of New Zealand with GNS Science, 2015)
    Dust whipped up and deposited by wind forms sheets of loess, which drape over the land. These loess deposits and the soils formed within them yield insights into past climatic and environmental change.