Research Commons

Browsing by Series "Tangihanga Research Programme"

Research Commons

Browsing by Series "Tangihanga Research Programme"

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  • Edge, Kiri; Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Rua, Mohi (2011)
    Although whānau/family that are configured by both Pākehā and Māori identities number significantly within New Zealand, there has been little or no attention paid to the ways in which these identities influence the bereavement ...
  • Edge, Kiri; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2010)
    Although whānau/family that are configured by both Pākehā and Māori identities number significantly within New Zealand, there has been little or no attention paid to the ways in which these identities influence the bereavement ...
  • Edge, Kiri; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga, 2010)
    New Zealand has a significant number of dual-cultural whānau (families) which incorporate the identities of both Pākehā (New Zealander of European descent) and Māori (indigenous peoples of New Zealand). Little attention ...
  • Moeke-Maxwell, Tess; Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga, 2010)
    The authors critically reflect on the autoethnographic process involved in navigating a smooth pathway towards investigating dying, death and bereavement for Māori whānau (families) in a way that supports and gives voice ...
  • Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Masters, Bridgette; Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (2012)
    Death is a universal event. It will happen to all of us, yet how we respond to death is particular and influenced by our cultural worlds. This study offers an investigation of the idiographic, of how one woman responded ...
  • Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia; Tamanui, Virginia (2013)
    Today we explore home as a place of spiritual belonging and continuity and how tangi relies on the genealogical connectedness of ancestral and living communities to care for the tūpāpaku, the human remains, and wairua, the ...
  • Jacob, Juanita; Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Ritchie, Jane (2011)
    Research about Maori children's experiences and perceptions of death and tangi (Maori death rituals) is sparse. What is available tends to be generalised and stems from Western paradigms of knowledge. In this study we ...
  • Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (Maori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2009)
    Moko patterns, mau moko, “wearing ink” is often explained as an act of remembrance, a symbol of honour or success, of grieving or loss. Memento mori, remembering the dead and remembrance of death, pervades the Maori world, ...
  • Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (2013)
    Customary death ritual and traditional practice have continued for the Maori (indigenous) people of Aotearoa/New Zealand, despite intensive missionary incursion and the colonial process. This paper critically considers ...
  • Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia; Rua, Mohi; Temara, Pou; Maxwell, Te Kahautu; Murphy, Enoka; McRae, Karyn Okeroa; Moeke-Maxwell, Tess (Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga, 2010)
    Death, observed through the process of tangihanga (time set aside to grieve and mourn, rites for the dead) or tangi (to grieve and mourn), is the ultimate form of Māori cultural expression. It is also the topic least studied ...
  • Rua, Hare; Rua, Mohi; Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga, 2010)
    In Te Urewera, wharemate (shelters in which the deceased receive their final farewells) have traditionally been temporary structures. In the 1980s, a new practice was introduced in the Ruātoki valley with the erection of ...