Now showing items 1-20 of 160

  • Adam Porter: a miner who became a ‘self-made man’

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Adam Porter won the accolade of being a ‘self-made man’ because of rising from humble beginnings in Scotland. After arriving in New Zealand, aged 12, and working hard for some years, he joined the South Island gold rushes ...
  • Aihe Pepene

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Sharing the same illustrious whakapapa as his brother Reha Aperahama, Aihe Pepene was prominent when living in the Thames district before settling at Te Aroha in 1878. When speculators tried to acquire the Thames foreshore ...
  • Akuhata Koropango Lipsey

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    The eldest son of George and Ema Lipsey, Augie, as he was known, was most notable, and popular, as a sportsman. A good rugby player in his youth, he later became a keen golfer. As well, he owned and raced horses, an interest ...
  • Akuhata Mokena: Eldest son of Mokena Hou

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Akuhata Mokena was recorded as being the first child of Mokena Hou and Rina. By the early 1860s he was living at the northern boundary of the Aroha Block as well as at Puriri, where he dug kauri gum. From 1857 to 1868 he ...
  • Alexander Mackay: a prospector and miner in Hauraki

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    A Scot, trained as a carpenter, Alexander Mackay was a prospector and miner for most of his life. After fighting in the Waikato War, he went to the new Thames gold field, where he invested in and worked in several mines. ...
  • Alfred Henry Whitehouse; a bootmaker who became a pioneer of New Zealand films

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    In December 1880, Alfred Henry Whitehouse set himself up in business in Te Aroha as its ‘Pioneer Bootmaker’. He had a very small involvement in local mining. As well as making boots and shoes, he tried to earn more money ...
  • Alice Grey Nicholls, daughter of William, and her husband, Charles John Dearle

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Alice Grey Nicholls was the ‘half-caste’ daughter of a Pakeha Maori, William Nicholls. She would marry a Pakeha and have several children, losing her only son but bringing up a family of daughters, who all received a Pakeha ...
  • Ani Jane Lipsey and Alexander Watson Edwards

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Ani Lipsey, the eldest daughter of George and Ema, was well educated. Her Scottish husband, who settled in Te Aroha in the 1880s, had been apprenticed as a draper, an occupation he followed in both Australia and then New ...
  • The Aroha block from 1880 onwards

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    With the discovery of gold in 1880 and the pressure to open the land for mining, there was a need to determine the boundaries of the Ngati Rahiri reserves and to subdivide these amongst the owners. As well, terms for paying ...
  • The Aroha block to 1879

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Te Aroha was valued by Maori because of its strategic position as well as its healing hot springs, while Pakeha anticipated acquiring a large area (which shrank in size once surveyed) of fertile farming land. Before the ...
  • The Aroha gold mining company, formed to work the prospectors’ claim at Te Aroha

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Because of high expectations for the Prospectors’ Claim, high prices for shares were paid even before the company was established on 22 November 1880 on terms very favourable for the vendors. Some observers felt it should ...
  • The Auckland smelting company

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Mining in the Tui portion of the Te Aroha field was revived in 1948 by Benjamin John Dunsheath, a small businessman who had owned several private companies, none of them very successful, in a career marked by dubious ...
  • Awaiting the proclamation of the Te Aroha goldfield: 1–24 November 1880

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Rumours about finds and prospects could not be proved either way until more prospecting could be done, and this had to await the official proclamation of the new goldfield. Despite optimism, no reef, or even a leader, had ...
  • The battery company, formed to operate the Firth and Clark Battery at Waiorongomai

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    The Battery Company was a private one, and although there were hints that other shareholders existed, only Josiah Clifton Firth and James McCosh Clark were known to be its owners. Firth was the more prominent of the two, ...
  • Before the battery started: mining at Waiorongomai from late 1881 to late 1883

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Throughout 1882 and 1883 hopes remained high for developing a successful goldfield, with some encouraging ore being found and experts praising the reefs. Investors were interested in the field, which officials expected to ...
  • The Bendigo battery: the last Waiorongomai battery

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    The Bendigo Battery was erected to treat ore from the mine of the same name, which was worked on a small scale, with the usual reportedly encouraging prospects, during the early twentieth century. Its site had been selected ...
  • Bernard Montague: a contractor and farmer in the Te Aroha district

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Born in Ireland, Bernard Montague arrived in New Zealand in 1874 and for some years worked as a contractor, especially on drainage projects. After being a publican and storekeeper for a year, he settled in Waiorongomai in ...
  • Black Americans and Te Aroha mining

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Although no black Americans lived in the Te Aroha district, several, including some miners, lived in Hauraki and indeed elsewhere in New Zealand. In general, blacks were stereotyped as figures of fun (as were the Irish ...
  • Charles Gallagher; an investor in mining

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Charles Gallagher, born in Ireland, for a time prospered when working on American silver mining fields. After arriving in New Zealand in 1883 with his Irish wife and young children, he settled at Thames, where for a while ...
  • Charles Gould: a farmer living near Te Aroha

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Coming from a wealthy business family and with a brother who became a successful businessman, Charles Gould left the South Island to settle in Waitoa with every prospect of making a success of the large estate he had ...