Now showing items 1-20 of 1459

  • The philosophical use and misuse of science

    Kingsbury, Justine; Dare, Tim (Wiley Blackwell, 2017)
    Science is our best way of finding out about the natural world, and philosophers who write about that world ought to be sensitive to the claims of our best science. There are obstacles, however, to outsiders using science ...
  • Declining towns and rapidly growing cities in New Zealand: developing an empirically-based model that can inform policy

    Brabyn, Lars (Institute for Governance and Policy Studies, School of Government at Victoria University of Wellington, 2017)
    Understanding and predicting spatial patterns in population change has significant implications for infrastructure, property investments, and national spatial planning. It is also at the core of understanding what motivates ...
  • Mokena Hou and his wife Rina

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Mokena Hou had a distinguished whakapapa, but as nephew to Hou was subordinate to the latter’s son, Karauna Hou. He was born near the Te Aroha hot pools, and his future wife, Rina, who also had illustrious ancestors, ...
  • Te Karauna Hou: the senior Ngati Rahiri rangatira

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Te Karauna Hou, the principal Ngati Rahiri rangatira living at Te Aroha in 1880, had a distinguished whakapapa linking him to several hapu. Before settling permanently at Te Aroha in the 1870s he lived in several places, ...
  • Lavinia and Henry Dunbar Johnson

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Rawinia Manukau, of Ngati Tamatera, married Henry Dunbar Johnson in 1868, when aged 21. Johnson had been a storekeeper at Coromandel from 1863 onwards and after 1866 had the first store at the site of the future Paeroa. ...
  • Joseph Campbell and his thermo-hyperphoric process

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Joseph Campbell was both an Anglican clergyman and a scientist, with a preference for the latter. Actively involved in educating the masses in scientific matters, and particularly those, like miners, with particular problems ...
  • Implementation framework for chronic disease intervention effectiveness in Maori and other indigenous communities

    Oetzel, John G.; Scott,Nina; Hudson, Maui; Masters-Awatere, Bridgette; Rarere, Moana; Foote, Jeff; Beaton, Angela; Ehau, Terry (BioMed Central Ltd, 2017)
    Background: About 40% of all health burden in New Zealand is due to cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes/obesity. Outcomes for Māori (indigenous people) are significantly worse than non-Maori; these inequities ...
  • Merea Wikiriwhi and George Thomas Wilkinson

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Merea Wikiriwhi was one of the few women to invest in Te Aroha mining. Her life has been traced in as much detail as can be found because so little has survived about the lives of Maori women. As George Thomas Wilkinson’s ...
  • Examination of the Accuracy and Applicability of Information in Popular Books on Dog Training

    Browne, Clare M.; Starkey, Nicola J.; Foster, T. Mary; McEwan, James S.A. (Brill Academic publishers, 2017)
    There is a wealth of popular literature available on dog behavior and training; sourcing reliable and trustworthy advice is important to achieving successful training. The aim of this study was to select five best-selling ...
  • That Dragon, Cancer: Contemplating life and death in a medium that has frequently trivialized both

    Schott, Gareth Richard (Digital Games Research Association, 2017)
    As a game mechanic, death has primarily been used to punish players for mistakes and failure. Over-reliance on screen-death possibly constitutes one of the most dated aspects of digital games as a contemporary medium. This ...
  • William Nicholls, Hera Te Whakaawa, and their children

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Two years after arriving in New Zealand in 1840, William Nicholls married Hera Te Whakaawa, who had an illustrious whakapapa. For the rest of his life he lived as a Pakeha Maori, trading and farming on land owned by his ...
  • The use of trastuzumab in New Zealand women with breast cancer

    Lawrenson, Ross; Lao, Chunhuan; Campbell, Ian; Harvey, Vernon; Brown, Charis; Seneviratne, Sanjeewa; Edwards, Melissa; Elwood, Mark; Kuper-Hommel, Marion (Wiley, 2017)
    Aim Trastuzumab was first funded in New Zealand for use in HER2+ve stage I–III breast cancer in 2007. This observational study aims to ascertain the patterns of use of trastuzumab in women with invasive HER2+ve breast ...
  • Modelling loanword success a sociolinguistic quantitative study of Māori loanwords in New Zealand English

    Calude, Andreea S.; Miller, Steven D.; Pagel, Mark (Mouton de Gruyter, 2017)
    Loanword use has dominated the literature on language contact and its salient nature continues to draw interest from linguists and non-linguists. Traditionally, loanwords were investigated by means of raw frequencies, which ...
  • "The manliest and noblest of all pursuits and professions": Two preacher novelists

    Moffat, Kirstine (Victoria University Press, 2016)
    The secular character of New Zealand has become an accepted `facts of our time. Nevertheless, Christian organizations and discourses have played an important role in framing New Zealand's life and identity.
  • Maori and mining in New Zealand and beyond

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Before the arrival of Europeans, Maori had known of the existence of gold but did not mine it and had no understanding of its value. Once mining commenced in California in 1849 and Australia in the early 1850s, many Maori ...
  • William Sharman Crawford (Billy) Nicholl, the prospector who discovered the Martha lode at Waihi: his life, told largely in his own words

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Billy Nicholl was that rare miner, one who recorded his life. Born in Ireland, when still a boy he arrived in New Zealand in 1862. After his father died at an early age, he acquired a step-father, whom he disliked, with ...
  • Black Americans and Te Aroha mining

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Although no black Americans lived in the Te Aroha district, several, including some miners, lived in Hauraki and elsewhere in New Zealand. In general, blacks were stereotyped as figures of fun (as were the Irish often), ...
  • Understanding cognitive functions related to driving following kava (Piper methysticum) use at traditional consumption volumes

    Aporosa, S. 'Apo' (SAGE Publications, 2017)
    Introduction: Kava (Piper methysticum), a traditional and culturally significant Pacific Island beverage, produces soporific relaxant effects similar to Benzodiazepine (Sarris et al, 2012, Journal of Human Psychopharmacology ...
  • Research tropospheres: assemblages of cows, sharemilkers and researcher in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Adams-Hutcheson, Gail (2017)
    Cresswell (2011) broadens mobility studies to include non-human objects and structures, but rarely, non-human animals and the weather. I add here both livestock and the more literal atmospheric conditions of sun, wind and ...
  • Harry Kenrick: the first warden of the Te Aroha mining district

    Hart, Philip (Historical Research Unit, University of Waikato, 2016)
    Because of his improvident father, Harry Kenrick left England for the Victorian goldfields before moving to the South Island of New Zealand. In 1865, he settled in the West Coast to begin a lifetime career of working for ...