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dc.contributor.authorHart, Philip
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-07T00:27:33Z
dc.date.available2016-06-28T02:11:28Z
dc.date.available2017-05-21T21:52:29Z
dc.date.available2017-09-07T00:27:33Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationHart, P. (2016). Black Americans and Te Aroha mining. (Te Aroha Mining District Working papers, No. 131). Hamilton, New Zealand: University of Waikato, Historical Research Unit.en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2463-6266
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10289/10470
dc.description.abstractAlthough no black Americans lived in the Te Aroha district, several, including some miners, lived in Hauraki and elsewhere in New Zealand. In general, blacks were stereotyped as figures of fun (as were the Irish often), but those who were known personally were treated differently. Visiting black American singers were admired for their vocal skills, and some settled in the colony, notably Robert Bradford Williams, who became mayor of the Wellington borough of Onslow. This paper focuses on three very different men peripherally involved in mining in the Te Aroha district. About the first, Alexander Jackson, a carter, little is known apart from his marital problems. The second, William La Grenade Mitchell, was an Auckland accountant and land agent and was well respected, being a prominent Mason. He quickly lost this respect when forced to flee to Australia, whereupon his complicated financial and marital circumstances became public knowledge. About the third man, Edward Ralph Martin (who claimed an exotic ethnic background), a great deal is known because of his incessant efforts to raise money, including from the government, for his enthusiastic but incompetent prospecting. Calling himself a ‘professor’ of music, in his efforts to make money he was involved in several frauds, although there may have been an element of self-delusion about the prospecting skills claimed. His private life was also complicated. One feature of this sample was that all three married white women, two of them also having white mistresses at a time when such liaisons, regular or irregular, were most certainly not socially acceptable.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherHistorical Research Unit, University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTe Aroha Mining District Working Papersen_NZ
dc.rights© 2016 Philip Harten_NZ
dc.titleBlack Americans and Te Aroha miningen_NZ
dc.typeWorking Paperen_NZ
uow.relation.series131en_NZ


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