Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorMichalos, Alex C.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWeijers, Dan M.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-14T01:31:55Z
dc.date.available2017-01-09en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-02-14T01:31:55Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-09en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationMichalos, A. C., & Weijers, D. M. (2017). Western historical traditions of well-being. In The Pursuit of Human Well-Being The Untold Global History (pp. 31–57). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39101-4_2en
dc.identifier.isbn3319391011en_NZ
dc.identifier.isbn9783319391014en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10289/10888
dc.description.abstractThis chapter provides a brief historical overview of Western philosophical views about well-being from the eighth century before the Common Era to the middle of the twentieth century. We explain different understandings of the concept of well-being, including our preferred understanding of well-being as the subjective states and objective conditions that make our lives go well for us. Although this review is necessarily incomplete, we discuss some of the most salient and influential contributions to our subject. To that end, we cover some key views from ancient Greece, including the aristocratic values that were considered central to leading a good life, notions of personal and more expansive harmony as they key to well-being, and the idea that the experience of pleasure is all we should really care about. We also explain some of the major religious conceptions of the good life and their progression through the Middle Ages and beyond. We further consider more recent secular conceptions of well-being, including several views on the importance of personal and public happiness. Finally, we discuss views to the effect that happiness is not enough for the good life and that we should strive for loftier goals.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishing
dc.rights© 2017 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.This is the author's accepted version. The final publication is available at Springer via dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39101-4_2
dc.subjectSocial Scienceen_NZ
dc.subjectWell-being
dc.subjectDoing well
dc.subjectEudaimonia
dc.subjectNature
dc.subjectWestern
dc.subjectHappiness
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleWestern historical traditions of well-beingen_NZ
dc.typeChapter in Book
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-39101-4_2
dc.relation.isPartOfThe Pursuit of Human Well-Being The Untold Global Historyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page31
pubs.elements-id191973
pubs.end-page57
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS/2018 PBRF - FASS
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS/School of Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FASS/School of Social Sciences/Philosophy
pubs.place-of-publicationCham, Switzerland
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319391007en_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record