Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Veroniqueen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLancaster, Gythaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGosman, Kimen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLawrenson, Rossen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T00:31:02Z
dc.date.available2016en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-08-14T00:31:02Z
dc.date.issued2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationGibbons, V., Lancaster, G., Gosman, K., & Lawrenson, R. (2016). Rural women’s perspectives of maternity services in the midland region of New Zealand. Journal of Primary Health Care, 8(3), 220–226. https://doi.org/10.1071/HC15051en
dc.identifier.issn1172-6164en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10289/11274
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Rural women face many challenges with regards to maternity services. Many rural primary birthing facilities in New Zealand have closed. The Lead Maternity Carer (LMC) model of maternity care, introduced in 1990, has moved provision of rural maternity care from doctors to independent midwifery services. Shortages of rural midwives in the Midland region led to rural maternity care being seen as a vulnerable service. AIM: To understand the views and experiences of rural women concerning maternity care, to inform the future design and provision of rural maternity services. METHODS: Participants were drawn from areas purposively selected to represent the five District Health Boards comprising the Midland health region. A demographic questionnaire, focus groups and individual interviews explored rural women’s perspectives of antenatal care provision. These were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Sixty-two women were recruited. Key themes emerging from focus groups and interviews included: access to services, the importance of safety and quality of care, the need for appropriate information at different stages, and the role of partners, family and friends in the birthing journey. While most women were happy with access to services, quality of care, provision of information, and the role of family in their care, for some women, this experience could be enhanced. CONCLUSION: Midwives are the frontline service for women seeking antenatal services. Support for rural midwives and for local birthing units is needed to ensure rural women receive services equal to that of their urban counterparts.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThis is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
dc.subjectRural
dc.subjectmaternity
dc.subjectmidwife
dc.subjecthealth services
dc.subjecthealth services
dc.titleRural women’s perspectives of maternity services in the midland region of New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/HC15051en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Primary Health Careen_NZ
pubs.begin-page220
pubs.elements-id200098
pubs.end-page226
pubs.issue3en_NZ
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/2018 PBRF
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/VICH
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/VICH/2018 PBRF - VICH
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume8en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1172-6156en_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record