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dc.contributor.authorNikora, Linda Waimarie
dc.contributor.authorTe Pohe, Yvonne
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Hamilton, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-05T03:40:28Z
dc.date.available2008-12-05T03:40:28Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationNikora, L. W. & Te Pohe, Y. (2008). What’s in a title? The use of honorifics in media coverage. In Levy, M., Nikora, L.W., Masters-Awatere, B., Rua, M. & Waitoki, W. (Eds). Claiming Spaces: Proceedings of the 2007 National Maori and Pacific Psychologies Symposium 23rd-24th November 2007 (pp. 74-76). Hamilton, New Zealand: Māori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikato.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978‐0‐473‐13577‐5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10289/1546
dc.description.abstractOn the 15th August 2006, Te Arikinui Dame Te Atairangikaahu (referred to in this paper as Te Arikinui) passed away at the age of 75 years old after serving the Kingitanga movement for forty years. Her passing heralded the movement of large numbers of people to Turangawaewae marae where she lay in state. Intensive media coverage played a significant role in representing who Te Arikinui was, in profiling the Kingitanga movement and activities associated with the tangi as it progressed from the 15th to the 21st August 2006. While we may be able to identify a “correct” honorific for Te Arikinui, our findings suggest that its understanding and use by mainstream television news media presenters, reporters and interviewees is a matter influenced by ethnic and cultural politics. The preferred use of titles by Maori and non-Maori sets up a process where representations of Te Ariki are contested. To non-Maori she is a “Dame”. To Maori, she is Te Arikinui. Through further analysis and theorising we will endeavour to further discuss the nature of these politics and the differences between Maori and non-Maori representations of Te Arikinui.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherMaori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikatoen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Maori and Psychology Research Unit, University of Waikato 2008 Each contributor has permitted the Maori and Psychology Research Unit to publish their work in this collection. No part of the material protected in this copyright notice may be reproduced or utilised in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the contributor concerned.en_US
dc.subjectMaorien_US
dc.subjectPacificen_US
dc.subjectpsychologyen_US
dc.subjectTe Arikinuien_US
dc.subjectkingitangaen_US
dc.titleWhat’s in a title? The use of honorifics in media coverageen_US
dc.typeConference Contributionen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfProceedings of the 2007 National Maori and Pacific Psychologies Symposiumen_NZ
pubs.begin-page74en_NZ
pubs.elements-id18399
pubs.end-page76en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2008-11-24en_NZ
pubs.start-date2008-11-23en_NZ


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