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dc.contributor.advisorDe Luca, Rosemary
dc.contributor.advisorWright, Noeline
dc.contributor.authorDeruage, Joseph Kuaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-01T15:51:44Z
dc.date.available2007-08-03T14:17:55Z
dc.date.issued2007en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationDeruage, J. K. (2007). Beginning primary teachers’ induction and mentoring practices in Papua New Guinea (Thesis, Master of Education (MEd)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/2250en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10289/2250
dc.description.abstractProfessional development of beginning teachers through induction and mentoring has been commonly viewed as important for teachers' success and continuation in the teaching profession. Induction and specifically mentoring programs focus attention on transitions from one stage of teacher development to another. The three phases of teacher development are initial teacher education, known as pre-service, the induction phase and the ongoing teacher in-service education. The move from student to teacher is the most demanding change in learning to teach. The beginning teacher in this change must adjust from thinking and acting as a student, absorbed with his or her own learning and performance, to thinking and acting as a teacher, accepting responsibility for the learning and performance of others. Beginning teachers are fully engaged in this essential development, and mentoring programs are purposely intended to support them through this period of change. This study has established that beginning teachers in Papua New Guinea (PNG) do experience challenges in the first few months of teaching but these issues lapse over time with the support and assistance of mentors/supervisors. Mentoring has great potential for group effort and transformational teacher learning within schools as professional learning communities. In order for mentors to perform their tasks well and draw benefits from mentoring, appropriate support and training for mentors is recommended. As well as support and training, other incentives for mentors such as salary increments and reduced teaching loads would be a welcome step to enhancing induction and mentoring programs in PNG primary schools.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectteacher educationen_NZ
dc.subjectprofessional developmenten_NZ
dc.subjectbeginning teacher inductionen_NZ
dc.subjectmentors and mentoring practicesen_NZ
dc.subjectprimary school teachers in Papua New Guineaen_NZ
dc.subjectteacher registration and certificationen_NZ
dc.subjectteacher developmenten_NZ
dc.titleBeginning primary teachers' induction and mentoring practices in Papua New Guineaen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Education (MEd)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2007-05-01T15:51:44Zen_NZ
uow.date.available2007-08-03T14:17:55Zen_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/public/adt-uow20070501.155144en_NZ
uow.date.migrated2009-06-09T23:31:51Zen_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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