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dc.contributor.authorNinnes, Calum Edward
dc.contributor.authorWaas, Joseph R.
dc.contributor.authorLing, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorNakagawa, Shinichi
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Jonathan C.
dc.contributor.authorBell, Dudley G.
dc.contributor.authorBright, A.
dc.contributor.authorCarey, P.W.
dc.contributor.authorChandler, J.
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Q.J.
dc.contributor.authorIngram, J.R.
dc.contributor.authorLyall, K.
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Dai K.J.
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Mark I.
dc.contributor.authorWallace, J.
dc.contributor.authorMöstl, E.
dc.coverage.spatialGermanyen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-10T20:04:37Z
dc.date.available2010-03-10T20:04:37Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationNinnes, C. E., Waas, J. R., Ling, N., Nakagawa, S., Banks, J. C., Bell, D. G., … , Möstl, E. (2010). Comparing plasma and faecal measures of steroid hormones in Adelie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae. Journnal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology, 180(1), 83-94.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10289/3698
dc.description.abstractPhysiological measurements of both stress and sex hormones are often used to estimate the consequences of natural or human-induced change in ecological studies of various animals. Different methods of hormone measurement exist, potentially explaining variation in results across studies; methods should be cross-validated to ensure that they correlate. We directly compared faecal and plasma hormone measurements for the first time in a wild free-living species, the Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae). Blood and faecal samples were simultaneously collected from individual penguins for comparison and assayed for testosterone and corticosterone (or their metabolites). Sex differences and variability within each measure, and correlation of values across measures were compared. For both hormones, plasma samples showed greater variation than faecal samples. Males had higher mean corticosterone concentrations than females, but the difference was only statistically significant in faecal samples. Plasma testosterone, but not faecal testosterone, was significantly higher in males than females. Correlation between sample types was poor overall, and weaker in females than in males, perhaps because measures from plasma represent hormones that are both free and bound to globulins, whereas measures from faeces represent only the free portion. Faecal samples also represent a cumulative measure of hormones over time, as opposed to a plasma ‘snapshot’ concentration. Our data indicate that faecal sampling appears more suitable for assessing baseline hormone concentrations, whilst plasma sampling may best define immediate responses to environmental events. Consequently, future studies should ensure that they select the most appropriate matrix and method of hormone measurement to answer their research questions.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringeren_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.springerlink.com/content/r083r88716633668/en
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Journnal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology. © 2010 Springer.en
dc.subjectAdelie penguinen
dc.subjectblooden
dc.subjectfaecalen
dc.subjectcorticosteroneen
dc.subjecttestosteroneen
dc.subjectsex differencesen
dc.subjectstreesen
dc.titleComparing plasma and faecal measures of steroid hormones in Adelie penguins Pygoscelis adeliaeen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00360-009-0390-0en
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Comparative Physiology Ben_NZ
pubs.begin-page83en_NZ
pubs.elements-id34404
pubs.end-page94en_NZ
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.volume180en_NZ


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