Research Commons

A mathematical optimisation model of a New Zealand dairy farm: The integrated dairy enterprise (IDEA) framework

Research Commons

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Doole, Graeme J.
dc.contributor.author Romera, Alvaro J.
dc.contributor.author Adler, Alfredo A.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-09T03:31:06Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-09T03:31:06Z
dc.date.issued 2012-04
dc.identifier.citation Doole, G.J., Romera, A.J. & Adler, A.A. (2012). A mathematical optimisation model of a New Zealand dairy farm: The integrated dairy enterprise (IDEA) framework. (Department of Economics Working Paper Series, Number 01/12). Hamilton, New Zealand: University of Waikato. en_NZ
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6699
dc.description.abstract Optimisation models are a key tool for the analysis of emerging policies, price sets, and technologies within grazing systems. A detailed nonlinear optimisation model of a New Zealand dairy farming system is described. The framework is notable for its rich portrayal of pasture and cow biology that add substantial descriptive power to standard approaches. Key processes incorporated in the model include: (1) pasture growth and digestibility that differ with residual pasture mass and rotation length, (2) pasture utilisation that varies by stocking rate, and (3) different levels of intake regulation. Model output is shown to closely match data from a more detailed simulation model (deviations between 0 and 5 per cent) and survey data (deviations between 1 and 11 per cent), providing confidence in its predictive capacity. Use of the model is demonstrated in an empirical application investigating the relative profitability of production systems involving different amounts of imported feed under price variation. The case study indicates superior profitability associated with the use of a moderate level of imported supplement, with Operating Profit ($NZ ha-1) of 934, 926, 1186, 1314, and 1093 when imported feed makes up 0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 per cent of the diet, respectively. Stocking rate and milk production per cow increase by 35 and 29 per cent, respectively, as the proportion of imported feed increases from 0 to 30 per cent of the diet. Pasture utilisation increases with stocking rate. Accordingly, pasture eaten and nitrogen fertiliser application increase by 20 and 213 per cent, respectively, as the proportion of imported feed increases from 0 to 30 per cent of the diet. en_NZ
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher University of Waikato en_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseries Department of Economics Working Paper Series
dc.rights ©2012 The Authors en_NZ
dc.subject dairy production en_NZ
dc.subject mathematical optimisation en_NZ
dc.subject whole-farm model en_NZ
dc.title A mathematical optimisation model of a New Zealand dairy farm: The integrated dairy enterprise (IDEA) framework en_NZ
dc.type Working Paper en_NZ
uow.relation.series 01/12


Full-text options:

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Research Commons


Advanced Search

Browse

Theses

About Research Commons

My Account

Usage Statistics

Share

  • Bookmark and Share