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‘Economics with training wheels’: Using blogs in teaching and assessing introductory economics

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dc.contributor.author Cameron, Michael Patrick
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-10T03:39:56Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-10T03:39:56Z
dc.date.issued 2011-03
dc.identifier.citation Cameron, M.P. (2011). ‘Economics with training wheels’: Using blogs in teaching and assessing introductory economics. (Department of Economics Working Paper Series, Number 02/11). Hamilton, New Zealand: University of Waikato. en_NZ
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6708
dc.description.abstract Blogs provide a dynamic interactive medium for online discussion, consistent with communal constructivist pedagogy. This paper explores the use of blogs in the teaching and assessment of a small (40-60 students) introductory economics paper. The role of blogs as a teaching, learning and assessment tool are discussed. Using qualitative and quantitative data collected across four semesters, students’ participation in the blog assessment is found to be associated with student ability, gender, and whether they are distance learners. Importantly, students with past economics experience do not appear to crowd out novice economics students. Student performance in tests and examinations does not appear to be associated with blog participation after controlling for student ability. However, students generally report overall positive experiences with the blog assessment. en_NZ
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher University of Waikato en_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseries Department of Economics Working Paper Series
dc.rights ©2011 The Author en_NZ
dc.subject economics education en_NZ
dc.subject blogs en_NZ
dc.subject teaching en_NZ
dc.subject assessment en_NZ
dc.title ‘Economics with training wheels’: Using blogs in teaching and assessing introductory economics en_NZ
dc.type Working Paper en_NZ
uow.relation.series 02/11


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