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Electronics and control technology

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dc.contributor.author Forret, Michael
dc.date.accessioned 2012-12-05T21:49:12Z
dc.date.available 2012-12-05T21:49:12Z
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier.citation Forret, M. (1997). Electronics and control technology. In J. Burns (Ed.), Technology in the New Zealand curriculum - Perspectives on Practice (pp.227-247). Palmerston North, New Zealand: Dunmore Press. en_NZ
dc.identifier.isbn 0864692803
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6925
dc.description.abstract Until recently, there was no requirement to learn electronics and control technology in the New Zealand school curriculum. Apart from isolated pockets of teaching based on the enthusiasm of individual teachers, there is very little direct learning of electronics in New Zealand primary or secondary schools. The learning of electronics is located in tertiary vocational training programmes. Thus, few school students learn about electronics and few school teachers have experience in teaching it. Lack of experience with electronics (other than using its products) has contributed to a commonly held view of electronics as out of the control and intellectual grasp of the average person; the domain of the engineer, programmer and enthusiast with his or her special aptitude. This need not be true, but teachers' and parents' lack of experience with electronics is in danger of denying young learners access to the mainstream of modern technology. en_NZ
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher Dunmore Press en_NZ
dc.rights © The Dunmore Press Ltd 1997. Used with permission en_NZ
dc.title Electronics and control technology en_NZ
dc.type Chapter in Book en_NZ


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