Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.advisorLealand, Geoff
dc.contributor.advisorSchott, Gareth Richard
dc.contributor.advisorYeatman, Bevin
dc.contributor.authorSnake-Beings, Emit
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-26T03:45:18Z
dc.date.available2016-02-26T03:45:18Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationSnake-Beings, E. (2016). The DiY [’Do it yourself’] Ethos: A participatory culture of material engagement (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9973en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10289/9973
dc.description.abstractDo it Yourself (DiY) is a participatory culture which exemplifies a particular ethos in its approach to technology and materials. Rather than engage with ‘complete’ technologies, such as a technology supplied as ready-to-go item, the DiY practitioners examined in this thesis engage with the raw materials of garbage and recycling, ‘incomplete’, broken and discarded technologies. In this type of DiY practice the emphasis is towards creating individualised and custom-built forms of technology: often made from components and materials which have been re-functioned from their original intention to produce new and unexpected functionalities; practices which disrupt the dominant discourses of technology. This thesis involves a situated application of theory to DiY practices in the field: focusing on three case studies featuring New Zealand-based DiY sound practitioners and their embracing of functional ‘errors’ as a means of increasing the participatory potential of materials. My initial argument is, that the social perspectives and ‘human-biased’ view examined in current literature on DiY culture, depicts an attitude towards power and knowledge which obscures the recognition of material agency. In this thesis, ‘power’ is defined within a social constructivist, or as a ‘human-biased’ view, whereas ‘agency’, as the ability to make something happen, is more expansive and incorporates the capacities of materials to become active participants in the production of cultural artefacts. Through engaging with the work of contemporary theorists relevant to material agency (including Karen Barad, Jane Bennett, Levi R. Bryant, Susan Kelly, Lambros Malafouris and Bruno Latour), the limitations of the ‘human-biased’ view of DiY culture are highlighted and the emphasis is shifted from DiY participatory culture as a social phenomenon towards the idea of ‘extended agency’: agency which includes both human and material actants within the entangled assemblages of DiY practices and the material environment. When extended agency is applied in the three case studies, the initial question asked is: ‘How does the intra-action of human and material environment influence the processes of DiY practices and what specific strategies are used to increase the participatory potential of materials?’. In this sense, DiY culture challenges the way we see ‘power’ and ‘structure’ as being exclusively human traits, influencing our way of relating to the material environment and creating consequences and considerations which extend from the localised DiY practices examined in this thesis. The suggestion is that the extended agency of DiY culture represents a timely re-evaluation of the relationship between the human and the material environment, challenging prevalent discourses which place the human at the centre of power and knowledge.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectMaterial agency
dc.subjectTechno-Animism
dc.subjectAnimism
dc.subjectMulti-Author
dc.subjectDo it Yourself culture
dc.subjectDiY
dc.subjectDo-it-yourself
dc.subjectmusic
dc.subjectrobotics and sound
dc.subjectnoise music
dc.subjectNew Zealand sound culture
dc.subjectExtended mind
dc.subjectextended agency
dc.subjectmachines
dc.subjectre-functioning
dc.subjectparticipatory culture
dc.subjectgarbage and new media
dc.subjectrecycling
dc.subjectupcycling
dc.subjecttrash
dc.subjectre-use
dc.subjectmachine talk
dc.subjectMaterial Entanglement
dc.subjectSteamPunk
dc.subjectde-territorialisation
dc.subjectinsider research
dc.subjecterror and inefficiency
dc.subjectnegative identity
dc.subjecttacit knowledge
dc.subjectdominant discourse of technology
dc.subjectintra-action
dc.subjectnon-idiomatic music
dc.subjectrandom aleatory sound
dc.subjectgenerative art
dc.subjectgenerative sound
dc.subjectBingodisiac machine
dc.subjectThe Trons: Robot garage band
dc.subjectOscillators
dc.subjectelectronic music
dc.subjectelectronic sound
dc.subjectperpetual prototype
dc.subjectThe Womble ethic
dc.subjectmaterial engagement
dc.subjectnon-human actants
dc.subjectDiY politics and the avant-garde
dc.subjectPractice-based theory
dc.subjectnon-totalising assemblage
dc.subjectinsider researcher
dc.subjectDiY electronics
dc.subjectcommunity of difference
dc.subjectmaterial practices
dc.subjectmaterial analysis
dc.subjectactants
dc.subjectcommunity of practice
dc.subjectHamilton music
dc.subjectHamilton sound culture
dc.subjectdistributive agency
dc.subjecttinkering and tinkerers
dc.subjectxtreme waste
dc.subjectmaterial environment
dc.subjecthuman and the material environment
dc.subjectre-functioned materials
dc.subjectrecycled art
dc.subjectdigital analogue
dc.subjectelectroacoustic music
dc.subjectsonic art
dc.subjectcomputer music
dc.subjectdigital music aesthetics and practice
dc.titleThe DiY ['Do it yourself'] Ethos: A participatory culture of material engagement
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.updated2016-02-22T01:23:00Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record