Now showing items 10230-10249 of 10401

  • Whisperer: A Study in Adaptation

    West, Brendan Robert (University of Waikato, 2012)
    It is becoming increasingly common in the modern theatre world for practitioners to be multi‐disciplinary. This thesis mates the skills of academia, scriptwriting, technical design and prop fabrication in order to create ...
  • Whistleblowing: The advantages of self-regulation

    Bather, Andrea; Kelly, Martin (2005-09)
    Although whistleblowers are often portrayed as courageous individuals worthy of respect, the act of whistleblowing can be viewed as a disloyal act which may bring much harm to the whistleblower’s colleagues. We argue that ...
  • White-noise susceptibility and critical slowing in neurons near spiking threshold

    Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair; Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Wilson, Marcus T.; Sleigh, James W. (American Physical Society, 2006)
    We present mathematical and simulation analyses of the below-threshold noisy response of two biophysically motivated models for excitable membrane due to H. R. Wilson: a squid axon (“resonator”) and a human cortical neuron ...
  • Whitiwhiti Korero: Exploring the researchers' relationship in cross-cultural research

    Simpson, Mary Louisa; Ake, Trudy (Taylor and Francis, 2010)
    This paper explores the intercultural relationship between two New Zealanders and its influence in an unfolding cross-cultural research project involving kaumātua (Māori elders). Using a “critical incidents” approach, the ...
  • Who are Protected by the Consumers’ Rights and Interests Protection Act? A Critique on the Current Statutory Definition of “Consumer”

    Liao, Zhixiong (Shanghai Joint Publishing Co 上海三联书店, 2016)
    “Consumer” is originally an economic rather than legal concept. Legislatives are struggling in legally defining “consumer”. China’s Consumers’ Rights and Interests Protection Act does not clearly define “consumer”, which ...
  • Who cares about carers? Experiences of community mental health support workers from a feminist perspective

    Taylor, Gabrielle Elizabeth (University of Waikato, 2015)
    Research regarding care labour is a relatively new area of interest. The long-term availability of a robust community care workforce has recently become a topical concern amongst many policy makers, scholars and activists ...
  • “Who do you mean?” Investigating miscommunication in paired interactions

    Ryan, Jonathon; Barnard, Roger (TESOLANZ, 2009)
    Professional experience, as well as a great deal of published research (e.g. Gass & Varonis, 1991; Varonis & Gass, 1985a), suggests that even successful users of English as a second language unwittingly give rise to ...
  • Who goes to a sexual health clinic? Gender differences in service utilisation.

    Morgan, Jane; Haar, Jarrod M. (New Zealand Medical Association, 2008-12)
    Aim: Our aim was to review utilisation of the Hamilton Sexual Health Clinic (Hamilton, Waikato, New Zealand) with regard to gender differences. Methods: Notes of those attending during 9 months (1 February 2008–31 ...
  • Who is coming from Vanuatu to New Zealand under the new Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) Program?

    McKenzie, David; Martinez, Pilar Garcia; Winters, L. Alan (University of Waikato, 2008-06)
    New Zealand’s new Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) program allows workers from the Pacific Islands to come to New Zealand for up to seven months to work in the horticulture and viticulture industries. One of the explicit ...
  • Who is learning what from student evaluations of teaching?

    King, Lance G.; Fraser, Deborah (Faculty of Education, University of Waikato, 2005)
    Student evaluations of teaching (or SET) through anonymous survey forms are a consistent practice in higher education across the world yet research results vary considerably as to the reliability, validity and efficacy of ...
  • Who laughs? A moment of laughter in Shortbus

    Yeatman, Bevin (Department of Information and Media Science, Aarhus University, 2008)
    In his essay On Laughter, first published in France in 1900, Henri Bergson suggested that “our laughter is always the laughter of the group” (2003:5). With this observation in mind, I have to ask: who laughs when we watch ...
  • Who owns native nature? Discourses of rights to land, culture, and knowledge in New Zealand

    Goldsmith, Michael (Cambridge University Press, 2009)
    Michael Brown famously asked ‘Who owns native culture?’ This paper revisits that question by analyzing what happens to culture when the culturally defined boundary between it and nature becomes salient in the context of ...
  • A whole cord model for the identification of mechanisms for the antivascular effects of DMXAA

    Moses, Kiriana Mihi (The University of Waikato, 2007)
    Endothelial cells form the inner lining of a blood vessel and their structure and functional integrity are important in maintenance of the vessel wall and circulatory function. These cells play key roles in immune and ...
  • Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals slow growth and low mutation rates during latent infections in humans

    Colangeli, Roberto; Arcus, Vickery L.; Cursons, Raymond T.; Ruthe, Ali; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathy; Manning, Shannon D.; Kim, Soyeon; Marchiano, Emily; Alland, David (2014)
    Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that ...
  • Whole-lake fish removal – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand (LERNZ), University of Waikato, 2015)
    A central objective of our lake restoration research was to remove invasive fish from 5 lakes of >5 ha in area to restore indigenous biodiversity. We chose a variety of lakes with dominant invasive fish species ranging ...
  • The whole-plant compensation point as a measure of juvenile tree light requirements

    Lusk, Christopher H.; Jorgensen, Murray A. (Wiley, 2013)
    1. Although ‘shade tolerance’ has featured prominently in the vocabulary of foresters and ecologists for a century, we have yet to agree on a standardized method for quantifying this elusive property. The ‘whole-plant ...
  • Whose future? Whose choosing?: Counselling in a context of (im)possible choice.

    Kotzé, Elmarie; Crocket, Kathie (Faculty of Education, University of Waikato., 2011)
    Critically reflexive practice is at the heart of counselling, and even more so when clients come face to face with (im)possible choices. As counsellor educators, the authors show counselling practice at the edge of ...
  • Whose knowledge is of most worth? The importance of listening to the voice of the learner.

    Scratchley, Margaret J. (Faculty of Education, University of Waikato, 2004)
    This paper discusses some of the data produced in the course of a research study that examined the perceptions that primary school aged children (7-13 year olds) had about their learning in health education. The study ...
  • Why aren't we all living in Smart Homes

    Suppers, Joris; Apperley, Mark (Department of Computer Science, The University of WaikatoACM, 2014)
    Visions of the Future, like the Jetsons cartoons, show homes which are smart and able to control household appliances, to make living easier and more comfortable. Although much research has been carried out into the ...
  • Why can’t screenplays be artworks?

    Nannicelli, Theodore (Wiley, 2011)
    Reviewing film and literary theorists’ writing on the subject of the screenplay, one finds a tradition both of conceiving of the screenplay as a kind of artwork and of denying it art status. However, philosophers of art ...