Now showing items 1-5 of 7

  • A 28,000 year old excavated painted rock from Nawarla Gabarnmang, northern Australia

    David, Bruno O.; Barker, Bryce; Petchey, Fiona; Delannoy, Jean-Jacques; Geneste, Jean-Michel; Rowe, Cassandra; Eccleston, Mark; Lamb, Lara; Whear, Ray (Elsevier, 2013)
    We report new archaeological excavations from northern Australia revealing part of a charcoal design likely to be c. 28,000 years old (and chrono-stratigraphically constrained within the period 15,600-45,600 cal BP) on a ...
  • A Pleistocene charcoal drawing or painting from northern Australia

    David, Bruno O.; Barker, Bryce; Delannoy, Jean-Jacques; Geneste, Jean-Michel; Petchey, Fiona; Lamb, Lara (ARAPE, 2014)
    Although claims are often made that Australia has evidence of some of the oldest rock art in the world and features prominently in rock art studies globally, very little of it is securely dated. Recently the first Pleistocene ...
  • Dating painted Panel E1 at Nawarla Gabarnmang, central-western Arnhem Land plateau

    David, Bruno; Delannoy, Jean-Jacques; Gunn, Robert; Chalmin, Emilie; Castets, Géraldine; Petchey, Fiona; Aplin, Ken; O'Farrell, Magen; Moffat, Ian; Mialanes, Jerome; Geneste, Jean-Michel; Barker, Bryce; Sadier, Benjamin; Katherine, Margaret; Manataki, Meropi; Pietrzak, Ursula (ANU Press, 2017)
    Western Arnhem Land, in the Top End of Australia’s Northern Territory, has a rich archaeological landscape, ethnographic record and body of rock art that displays an astonishing array of imagery on shelter walls and ceilings. ...
  • Determining the age of paintings at JSARN–113/23, Jawoyn Country, central-western Arnhem Land plateau

    David, Bruno O.; Delannoy, Jean-Jacques; Gunn, Robert; Brady, Liam M.; Petchey, Fiona; Mialanes, Jerome; Chalmin, Emilie; Geneste, Jean-Michel; Moffat, Ian; Aplin, Ken; Katherine, Margaret (ANU Press, 2017)
    Western Arnhem Land in northern Australia has the rare distinction, both at national and global scales, of containing a vast landscape of many thousands of rockshelters richly decorated with art, some of which was probably ...
  • Earliest evidence for ground-edge axes: 35,400±410 cal BP from Jawoyn Country, Arnhem Land

    Geneste, Jean-Michel; David, Bruno O.; Plisson, Hugues; Clarkson, Chris; Delannoy, Jean-Jacques; Petchey, Fiona; Whear, Ray (Australian Archaeology Association, 2010)
    Evidence for the world’s earliest stone tools dates to 3.4 million years ago and pre-dates the earliest known Homo species in eastern Africa. However ground-edged tools did not appear until the dispersal of cognitively ...