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dc.contributor.authorRoper, Julieten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Eva Marieen_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialNaples, Italyen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T22:30:49Z
dc.date.available2016en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-02-09T22:30:49Z
dc.date.issued2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationRoper, J., & Collins, E. M. (2016). Sustainability, hegemony and the dialectics of change. Presented at the 32nd EGOS Colloquium, Naples, Italy.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/10880
dc.description.abstractGiven that at its centre lies a concern for enduring global social and environmental welfare, for many sustainability appears to be a common sense concept. However, in an economic system that is based upon continued economic growth, the notion that social and environmental imperatives should be at least equal in priority across all sectors of society (government, business and civil society) means that sustainability is inherently fraught with tensions. A recent review of business and society literature reveals that little analysis has been published on the nature of these tensions within and between organisations and sectors, including government (Van der Byl & Slawinski, 2015). Further, little critical examination is available of why and how, given what is at stake, economic imperatives continue to be favoured over social and environmental ones.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.egosnet.org/2016_naples/general_theme
dc.rightsPaper presented at the 32nd EGOS Colloquium, Naples, Italy, July 7-9, 2016.
dc.source32nd EGOS Colloquiumen_NZ
dc.titleSustainability, hegemony and the dialectics of changeen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
pubs.elements-id142072
pubs.finish-date2016-07-09en_NZ
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.egosnet.org/2016_naples/general_themeen_NZ
pubs.start-date2016-07-07en_NZ


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