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dc.contributor.authorHunt, Sonyaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLowe, Simonen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Kellyen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKuruvila, Alberten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWebber-Dreadon, Emmaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-28T23:54:06Z
dc.date.available2016en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-02-28T23:54:06Z
dc.date.issued2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHunt, S., Lowe, S., Smith, K., Kuruvila, A., & Webber-Dreadon, E. (2016). Transition to professional social work practice: the initial year. Advances in Social Work & Welfare Education, 18(1), 55–71.en
dc.identifier.issn1329-0584en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/10913
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents the findings of the first year of a three-year longitudinal study of new graduate social workers from a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program in Aotearoa New Zealand. We compare work outcomes and graduates’ perceptions of their readiness for practice against the New Zealand Social Workers Registration Board’s (SWRB’s) 10 core competencies. This study’s impetus came from an increase in the professionally accepted minimum qualification benchmark, recent political commentary on the preparedness of social work graduates, and associated roles of the SWRB and Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Work (ANZASW). The aim of this longitudinal research is to track paid and unpaid work outcomes and identify the support needs of social work graduates as they transition from students into professional practitioners. An on-line questionnaire offered graduates the opportunity to comment annually on their professional progress. The respondents all found paid employment as social workers in that first year and identified transitional challenges. Supports to ease this transition included supervision, mentoring, collegiality, coaching, case-load protection (both volume and complexity), continuing professional development, and professional networking. Concluding that the first year of practice is a highly demanding one, we highlight the need for new graduates to have reduced case-loads and additional levels of support. This article is highly relevant for the profession in Aotearoa New Zealand and elsewhere, particularly for countries such as Australia where there is no legislated registration process for social workers.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAustralian and New Zealand Social Work and Welfare Education and Researchen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is published in the Advances in Social Work & Welfare Education. Used with permission.
dc.subjectnewly qualified social workersen_NZ
dc.subjecttransition from graduate to social workeren_NZ
dc.subjectpreparation for practiceen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial work registrationen_NZ
dc.subjectpractice standardsen_NZ
dc.subjectcompetenciesen_NZ
dc.titleTransition to professional social work practice: the initial yearen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfAdvances in Social Work & Welfare Educationen_NZ
pubs.begin-page55
pubs.elements-id138625
pubs.end-page71
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.waikato.ac.nz/fullText;dn=061710845032755;res=IELHSSen_NZ
pubs.volume18en_NZ


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