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dc.contributor.authorRinehart, Robert E.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCaudwell, Jayneen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T01:00:10Z
dc.date.available2017en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-03-31T01:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationRinehart, R. E., & Caudwell, J. (2017). Sport-war cartoon art. Media, War and Conflict, 1–21.en
dc.identifier.issn1750-6352en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/10976
dc.description.abstractIn this article, We explore the extent to which political cartoons and comic strips – as mediated public and political visual art, the ‘ninth art’ according to Groensteen’s The System of Comics (2007[1999] – subvert/confirm institutional values of so-called Western democracies during times of war. Our concern, as sociologists of sport, is with the ways dominant sporting sensibilities are (re)presented in cartoon art, and how sport itself is conflated with patriotic ideologies of war as a vehicle for propaganda. In particular, We interrogate how competitive- sporting ideals are aligned with war and conflict, and mobilized by cartoons during periods of Western-asserted conflict. We are intrigued by how some cartoon illustrations have the visual power to misplace, simplify and essentialize – via sporting analogy – the intense and complex emotions surrounding war. The aim of the article is to examine how the visual within popular culture is used to dis-connect and dis-engage a public with the realities of war and human conflict.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1750635217696435en_NZ
dc.rights© The Authors 2017.
dc.titleSport-war cartoon arten_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfMedia, War and Conflicten_NZ
pubs.begin-page1
pubs.elements-id193445
pubs.end-page21


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