Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorRameka, Lesley Kayen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-29T21:25:29Z
dc.date.available2016en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-06-29T21:25:29Z
dc.date.issued2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationRameka, L. (2016). Ngā Tuakiri o te Tangata: Being Māori in Early Childhood Education. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1017/jie.2016.13en
dc.identifier.issn1326-0111en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11131
dc.description.abstractBefore the arrival of Europeans in Aotearoa, New Zealand and their subsequent settlement in the 1800s, there was no concept of a Māori identity. Over time, however, as a result of rapid colonisation, Māori became a minority population in New Zealand. Consequently, the term Māori as normal or usual, began to lose its meaning (Webber, 2008), and another meaning began to emerge based on contrasts with the Pākehā settler population. This paper explores the complex and increasingly diverse nature of Māori identities in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand, including contemporary early childhood contexts. It discusses the importance of negotiating the terrains of cultural knowledge, values and understandings in order to define what ‘being Māori’ means for teachers and children in an increasingly diverse and complex settings.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_NZ
dc.rights© 2016 The Author
dc.titleNgā Tuakiri o te Tangata: Being Māori in Early Childhood Educationen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/jie.2016.13en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfThe Australian Journal of Indigenous Educationen_NZ
pubs.begin-page1
pubs.elements-id194928
pubs.end-page11
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2049-7784en_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record