Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorLeonard, Kaedenen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHewitt, Chad L.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Marnie L.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPrimo, Campbellen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Steven D.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-26T03:54:10Z
dc.date.available2017en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-07-26T03:54:10Z
dc.date.issued2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationLeonard, K., Hewitt, C. L., Campbell, M. L., Primo, C., & Miller, S. D. (2017). Epibiotic pressure contributes to biofouling invader success. Scientific Reports, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-05470-2en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11229
dc.description.abstractReduced competition is a frequent explanation for the success of many introduced species. In benthic marine biofouling communities, space limitation leads to high rates of overgrowth competition. Some species can utilise other living organisms as substrate (epibiosis), proffering a competitive advantage for the epibiont. Additionally, some species can prevent or reduce epibiotic settlement on their surfaces and avoid being basibionts. To test whether epibiotic pressure differs between native and introduced species, we undertook ex situ experiments comparing bryozoan larval settlement to determine if introduced species demonstrate a greater propensity to settle as epibionts, and a reduced propensity to be basibionts, than native species. Here we report that introduced species opportunistically settle on any space (bare, native, or introduced), whereas native species exhibit a strong tendency to settle on and near other natives, but avoid settling on or near introduced basibionts. In addition, larvae of native species experience greater larval wastage (mortality) than introduced species, both in the presence and absence of living substrates. Introduced species’ ability to settle on natives as epibionts, and in turn avoid epibiosis as basibionts, combined with significantly enhanced native larval wastage, provides a comprehensive suite of competitive advantages contributing to the invasion success of these biofouling species.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05470-2en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
dc.titleEpibiotic pressure contributes to biofouling invader successen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-05470-2en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfScientific Reportsen_NZ
pubs.elements-id200056
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_NZ
pubs.volume7en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-no5173


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record