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dc.contributor.advisorFoster, T. Mary
dc.contributor.advisorMcEwan, James S.A.
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Carly Anna
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-03T02:27:36Z
dc.date.available2017-08-03T02:27:36Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationWalker, C. A. (2017). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Stress and Burnout: Evaluating the effect of the online training, PsyFlex6 for Behavioural Therapists (Thesis, Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/11247en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11247
dc.description.abstractThe present research used a randomized controlled design to evaluate the effects of ‘PsyFlex6,’ an online Acceptance and Commitment Training paradigm, for behavioural therapists. Twelve participants completed the six-week ACT training protocol, while another twelve waited. All participants completed measures of psychological flexibility, psychological distress, and burnout at baseline, during training, and post training, and at one and two month follow up measures for trained participants. Later, nine control group participants accepted training, as well as an additional four new participants. In total, 21 individuals completed all training and measures; results from all participants were pooled to observe any effect of the training over all time periods. As hypothesized, initial group comparisons revealed significant benefit for trained participants over controls in areas of psychological flexibility and psychological distress. Further hypotheses that burnout components (total burnout, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment) would be improved, were not supported, but trained participants did exhibit positive change for each of these dimensions. When data were pooled, significant positive changes were observed for psychological flexibility, distress, emotional exhaustion and total burnout, after training and maintained at follow up periods. Personal accomplishment and depersonalization were also improved from baseline, but not significantly so. In general, social validity data indicate that training content was well comprehended, useful, and that strategies were often used outside of training. Therefore, these findings support the use of PsyFlex6 as a training tool for improving the psychological wellbeing of behavioural therapists.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectAcceptance and Commitment Therapy
dc.subjectStress
dc.subjectBurnout
dc.subjectBehaviour Therapists
dc.subjectApplied Behaviour Analysis
dc.subjectonline
dc.titleAcceptance and Commitment Therapy for Stress and Burnout: Evaluating the effect of the online training, PsyFlex6 for Behavioural Therapists
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
dc.date.updated2017-03-22T03:34:31Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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