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dc.contributor.authorMilne, Louiseen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorChatoney, Marjolaineen_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialMarseilles, Franceen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-19T02:01:45Z
dc.date.available2015en_NZ
dc.date.available2017-10-19T02:01:45Z
dc.date.issued2015en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationMilne, L. (2015). Manahi’s red chocolate sunglasses: the impact of a learning experience outside the classroom on a five-year-old student’s technological practice. In M. Chatoney (Ed.), Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design and Technology Education (pp. 287–292). Marseilles, France.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-2-85399-994-6en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11413
dc.description.abstractKnowledge of expert practice is a key element of Technology Education, and this paper which is part of a larger study, investigates the impact a learning experience outside the classroom has on one student’s technological practice. This student, who is in his first year at school, visits a chocolate factory with his class to find out how to make a chocolate gift for Mothers’ Day. This study uses a qualitative case study methodology (Stake, 2006). Data were collected and analysed from three interviews, before, after, and six months after the visit to the factory. The student’s drawings and stories recorded after the visit were also analysed using themes emerging from the literature of Education Outside the Classroom (Anderson, 2003; Falk, 2004), Technology Education (Compton, 2009; de Vries, 2012; Jones, Buntting, & de Vries, 2013) and the characteristics of young students’ learning (Cohen, 2013; Siegler & Alibali, 2005). The findings from this study identify a significant increase in the student’s context specific oral language, his understanding of the individual phases of technological development, and an ability to transfer these understandings to other contexts including those presented six months after the visit. Whilst these developments showed an encouraging improvement in Manahi’s technological understandings, there existed a lack of continuity and connectedness (Moreland & Cowie, 2011) through the development of his chocolate gift. This impacted negatively on his perceptions of the purpose of the visit and the final goal of his practice.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsThis article is published under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial -NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationl License.
dc.source29th PATT conferenceen_NZ
dc.subjectTechnology education
dc.subjectprimary
dc.subjecttechnological practice
dc.subjecteducation outside the classroom
dc.subjectconnectivity
dc.titleManahi’s red chocolate sunglasses: the impact of a learning experience outside the classroom on a five-year-old student’s technological practiceen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.relation.isPartOfPlurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design and Technology Educationen_NZ
pubs.begin-page287
pubs.elements-id129063
pubs.end-page292
pubs.finish-date2015-04-10en_NZ
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/2018 PBRF
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FEDU
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FEDU/2018 PBRF - FEDU
pubs.organisational-group/Waikato/FEDU/Te Hononga School of Curriculum and Pedagogy
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01161553/documenten_NZ
pubs.start-date2015-04-07en_NZ


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