Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorDaya-Winterbottom, Ten_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialUniversity of Tasmania, Hobarten_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-01T02:18:13Z
dc.date.available2018-02-06en_NZ
dc.date.available2018-06-01T02:18:13Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-06en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationDaya-Winterbottom, T. (2018). Personality and Representation in Environmental Law. Presented at the Environmental Frontiers IV Colloquium,, University of Tasmania, Hobart.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/11874
dc.description.abstractJorge Vinuales from the University of Cambridge observed in his working paper on “Law and the Anthropocene” that law is founded on a series of core concepts, such as, “legal personality, representation, obligation, debt, causality or damage” (CEENRG Working Papers 2016- 4, page 49). This led him to note that a “significant problem” faced by environmental law is how to flesh out these core concepts in relation to the protection of the environment (page 53). For example, should we regard natural resources (e.g. rivers or mountains) as “subjects” of environmental law with their “own interests and capacity to act (through representation)”, or merely as the “objects” of environmental law – to be protected either “directly” as specific natural resources, or “indirectly” via the protection of the environment generally (page 53). This article interrogates these perspectives by reference to recent New Zealand developments.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.rights© 2018 The Author
dc.sourceEnvironmental Frontiers IV Colloquium,en_NZ
dc.titlePersonality and Representation in Environmental Lawen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
pubs.elements-id222032
pubs.finish-date2018-02-07en_NZ
pubs.start-date2018-02-06en_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record