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dc.contributor.authorWest, Annie Graceen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKing, Carolyn M.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-11T00:40:09Z
dc.date.available2018-01-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2018-09-11T00:40:09Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWest, A. G., & King, C. M. (2018). Variation in mandible shape and body size of house mice Mus musculus in five separate New Zealand forest habitats. New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 45(2), 136–153. https://doi.org/10.1080/03014223.2017.1411955en
dc.identifier.issn0301-4223en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12072
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates variation in house mouse Mus musculus body size and mandible shape across New Zealand, using geometric morphometrics and biomechanical advantage analyses. The Mus phylogroups currently known in New Zealand include Mus musculus domesticus, M. m. musculus and M. m. castaneus. We examined samples of house mice inhabiting five different podocarp and beech forest environments across the North and South Islands (Pureora Forest, Zealandia Wildlife Sanctuary, Craigieburn Forest Park, Eglinton Valley and Hollyford Valley). Significant variation in mandible shape and body size was found between all five forest populations. South Island mice had larger bodies and greater mechanical advantage in the temporalis muscle compared with their North Island counterparts. Zealandia Sanctuary mouse mandibles were broader and shorter than South Island mouse mandibles, and had greater masseter muscle advantage. Centroid size and body weight, but not head-body length, varied significantly with two distinct genetic haplotypes. Finally, annual rainfall was the most significant covariate with mandible shape. Higher rainfall locations were generally associated with soft-food related mandible shapes, while lower rainfall correlated with hard-food mandible shapes. This preliminary investigation provides the framework for further research into mandible shape and body size variation in New Zealand house mice.
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: New Zealand Journal of Zoology. © 2018 The Royal Society of New Zealand.
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectZoologyen_NZ
dc.subjectGeometric morphometricsen_NZ
dc.subjectislanden_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectcastaneusen_NZ
dc.subjectdomesticusen_NZ
dc.subjectenvironmental variablesen_NZ
dc.subjectmandible shapeen_NZ
dc.subjectbody sizeen_NZ
dc.subjecthouse mouseen_NZ
dc.subjectinsularen_NZ
dc.subjectGEOMETRIC MORPHOMETRICSen_NZ
dc.subjectBERGMANNS RULEen_NZ
dc.subjectMAMMALIAN PREDATORSen_NZ
dc.subjectISLAND POPULATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectINTRODUCED MICEen_NZ
dc.subjectRATTUS-RATTUSen_NZ
dc.subjectJAW MUSCLESen_NZ
dc.subjectMOUSEen_NZ
dc.subjectEVOLUTIONen_NZ
dc.subjectRODENTSen_NZ
dc.titleVariation in mandible shape and body size of house mice Mus musculus in five separate New Zealand forest habitatsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03014223.2017.1411955en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Journal of Zoologyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page136
pubs.elements-id218230
pubs.end-page153
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume45en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1175-8821en_NZ


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