Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorStuart, Margaret J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRameka, Lesley Kayen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T01:26:23Z
dc.date.available2018en_NZ
dc.date.available2018-11-30T01:26:23Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationStuart, M. J., & Rameka, L. K. (2018). Prismatic storying: Making visible multi coloured codes. Knowledge Cultures, 6(1), 79–96. https://doi.org/10.22381/KC6120187en
dc.identifier.issn2327-5731en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12218
dc.description.abstractLanguage is a casement into cultures' deepest meanings. As children acquire languages, they implicitly adopt the mores of people around them; read the symbols, artefacts and codes. In this article, we examine the importance of language and literacy in the early childhood curriculum Te Whariki: He Whariki Matauranga mo nga Mokopuna o Aotearoa/Early Childhood Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1996). The focus of the article is on literacy from a bicultural perspective. Adults support children in finding out about both their social and physical worlds. They use their 'imaginations to explore their own and others' identities' (MoE, 1996, p. 25). Our aim is to offer teachers in mainstream early childhood centres (ECE) strategies to apply, practise and situate literacy approaches that reflect Te Ao Maori through stories reflecting symbolic representations of people, places and things.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAddleton Academic Publishersen_NZ
dc.rights© 2018 Knowledge Cultures.
dc.titlePrismatic storying: Making visible multi coloured codesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.22381/KC6120187en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfKnowledge Culturesen_NZ
pubs.begin-page79
pubs.elements-id221417
pubs.end-page96
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume6en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2375-6527en_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record