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dc.contributor.authorDickie, Ian A.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBoyer, Stephaneen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Hannah L.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Richard P.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Paul P.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Ian D.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHoldaway, Robert J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLear, Gavinen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMakiola, Andreasen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMorales, Sergio E.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Jeff R.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Louiseen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-13T20:07:35Z
dc.date.available2018-09-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-01-13T20:07:35Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationDickie, I. A., Boyer, S., Buckley, H. L., Duncan, R. P., Gardner, P. P., Hogg, I. D., … Weaver, L. (2018). Towards robust and repeatable sampling methods in eDNA-based studies. Molecular Ecology Resources, 18(5), 940–952. https://doi.org/10.1111/1755-0998.12907en
dc.identifier.issn1755-098Xen_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12261
dc.description.abstractDNA‐based techniques are increasingly used for measuring the biodiversity (species presence, identity, abundance and community composition) of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there are numerous reviews of molecular methods and bioinformatic steps, there has been little consideration of the methods used to collect samples upon which these later steps are based. This represents a critical knowledge gap, as methodologically sound field sampling is the foundation for subsequent analyses. We reviewed field sampling methods used for metabarcoding studies of both terrestrial and freshwater ecosystem biodiversity over a nearly three‐year period (n = 75). We found that 95% (n = 71) of these studies used subjective sampling methods and inappropriate field methods and/or failed to provide critical methodological information. It would be possible for researchers to replicate only 5% of the metabarcoding studies in our sample, a poorer level of reproducibility than for ecological studies in general. Our findings suggest greater attention to field sampling methods, and reporting is necessary in eDNA‐based studies of biodiversity to ensure robust outcomes and future reproducibility. Methods must be fully and accurately reported, and protocols developed that minimize subjectivity. Standardization of sampling protocols would be one way to help to improve reproducibility and have additional benefits in allowing compilation and comparison of data from across studies.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWILEYen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Molecular Ecology Resources. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectBiochemistry & Molecular Biologyen_NZ
dc.subjectEcologyen_NZ
dc.subjectEvolutionary Biologyen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences & Ecologyen_NZ
dc.subjectcontaminationen_NZ
dc.subjectenvironmental DNAen_NZ
dc.subjectexperimental designen_NZ
dc.subjectmetabarcodingen_NZ
dc.subjectmetadataen_NZ
dc.subjectsamplingen_NZ
dc.subjectBACTERIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTUREen_NZ
dc.subjectSTORAGE-CONDITIONSen_NZ
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL DNAen_NZ
dc.subjectMYCORRHIZAL FUNGIen_NZ
dc.subjectOMICS DATAen_NZ
dc.subjectT-RFLPen_NZ
dc.subjectSOILen_NZ
dc.subjectBIODIVERSITYen_NZ
dc.subjectDIVERSITYen_NZ
dc.subjectECOLOGYen_NZ
dc.titleTowards robust and repeatable sampling methods in eDNA-based studiesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1755-0998.12907en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfMolecular Ecology Resourcesen_NZ
pubs.begin-page940
pubs.elements-id226227
pubs.end-page952
pubs.issue5en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume18en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1755-0998en_NZ


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