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dc.contributor.authorLowe, David J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorde Lange, Peter J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorShane, Phil A.R.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorClarkson, Bruce D.en_NZ
dc.contributor.editorBrook, M.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-15T23:10:09Z
dc.date.available2017-11-28en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-01-15T23:10:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-28en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationLowe, D.J., Shane, P.A.R., de Lange, P.J., Clarkson, B.D. (2017). Rangitoto Island field trip, Auckland. In: Brook, M. (compiler). Fieldtrip Guides, Geosciences 2017 Conference, Auckland, New Zealand. Geoscience Society of New Zealand Miscellaneous Publication 147B, 56 pp.
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-9922634-3-0en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2230-4487en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12270
dc.description.abstractRangitoto, Māori for ‘blood red sky’ (also ‘lava, scoria’), derives from the phrase Ngā Rangi-i-totongia-a Tama-te-kapua (the full name for the island) meaning “the day the blood of Tamatekapua was shed”, referring to a battle between Tamatekapua and Hoturoa, commanders of the Arawa and Tainui canoes, respectively, at Islington Bay. The Island is arguably Auckland’s most beloved and omnipresent landscape feature. It is a symmetrical, ~6-km wide, basaltic shield volcano that last erupted c. 550‒500 calendar/calibrated (cal.) yr BP (c. 1400‒1450 AD), not long after arrival and settlement of Polynesians in the Auckland region (c. 1280 AD). It is by far the largest, and the youngest, volcano in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF). The AVF consists of ~53 individual eruptive centres, all of which lie within the boundaries of the Auckland urban area. Recent research on deposits in a 150-m-long drill core obtained from Rangitoto Island in February, 2014, and on cryptotephras in sediments from Lake Pupuke on North Shore and on tephras in wetlands on adjacent Motutapu Island, has revealed Rangitoto’s complex history, with three main phases (1‒3) suggested. The flora on Rangitoto is unique among the islands situated in the Hauraki Gulf because of the island’s young age, and the fact that technically Rangitoto is an ‘oceanic’ island. Its flora and fauna are derived entirely from long distance dispersal. The island contains some 582 vascular plant taxa of which 228 (39%) are indigenous.en_NZ
dc.formatPublished onlineen_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGeoscience Society of New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectRangitotoen_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland Volcanic Fielden_NZ
dc.subjectbasaltic shield volcanoen_NZ
dc.subjectlava texturesen_NZ
dc.subjectearly Maorien_NZ
dc.subjectpohutukawaen_NZ
dc.subjectlava flowsen_NZ
dc.subjectscoria conesen_NZ
dc.subjectRangitoto tephraen_NZ
dc.subjectalkalic basalten_NZ
dc.subjectsubalkalic basalten_NZ
dc.subjectcryptotephraen_NZ
dc.subjectWorld War II Aucklanden_NZ
dc.subjectfloraen_NZ
dc.subjectUdorthentsen_NZ
dc.subjectUdifolistsen_NZ
dc.subjectPalehumulten_NZ
dc.subjectTephric Sandy Recent Soilsen_NZ
dc.subjectTypic Tephric Recent Soilsen_NZ
dc.subjectRocky Recent Soilsen_NZ
dc.subjectRocky Raw Soilsen_NZ
dc.subjectMetrosideros excelsaen_NZ
dc.subjectvegetation successionen_NZ
dc.subjectvolcanic islanden_NZ
dc.subjectMotutapu Islanden_NZ
dc.subjectSunde siteen_NZ
dc.subjectarchaeologyen_NZ
dc.subjectRangitoto Islanden_NZ
dc.subjectHauraki Gulfen_NZ
dc.subjectFolistsen_NZ
dc.titleRangitoto Island field trip, Aucklanden_NZ
dc.typeBook
pubs.begin-page1
pubs.editionGeoscience Society of New Zealand Miscellaneous Publicationen_NZ
pubs.elements-id214562
pubs.end-page56
pubs.place-of-publicationAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume147Ben_NZ


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