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dc.contributor.authorvan Duijn, Tinaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHoskens, Merel C.J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMasters, Rich S.W.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-17T21:06:40Z
dc.date.available2019-02-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-02-17T21:06:40Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationvan Duijn, T., Hoskens, M. C. J., & Masters, R. S. W. (2019). Analogy instructions promote efficiency of cognitive processes during hockey push-pass performance. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 8(1), 7–20. https://doi.org/10.1037/spy0000142en
dc.identifier.issn2157-3905en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12335
dc.description.abstractAnalogy instructions may promote effective skill acquisition by providing movement-specific information that can be processed as a single, meaningful unit, rather than as separate “bits” of information (Liao & Masters, 2001; Masters, 2000). Behavioral evidence suggests that information processing associated with analogy instructions is less effortful than information processing associated with explicit instructions, resulting in reduced verbal−analytical involvement in movement control (Lam, Maxwell, & Masters, 2009b). This experiment was designed to test whether analogy instructions promote higher psychomotor efficiency, characterized by greater high-α power in the left hemisphere of the brain (Hillman, Apparies, Janelle, & Hatfield, 2000) and reduced coactivation between the verbal processing (left temporal lobe T7) and motor planning regions of the brain (frontal midline Fz; Hatfield & Hillman, 2001) during motor performance. Novices practiced a hockey push-pass task using an analogy instruction, explicit instructions, or no instructions (control). Push-pass accuracy during a combined task (passing coupled with decision-making) was significantly better following the analogy instruction, which suggested that information processing was less effortful. Left-temporal (T7) electroencephalography (EEG) high-α power was significantly higher in the analogy condition, but T7−Fz coactivation was not significantly different among the conditions. It is possible that the analogy instruction influenced verbal aspects of information processing without impacting the efficiency of motor planning. Consequently, an analogy instruction may promote cognitive, rather than psychomotor, efficiency.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology. © 2018 American Psychological Association.
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectHospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourismen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychology, Applieden_NZ
dc.subjectSocial Sciences - Other Topicsen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychologyen_NZ
dc.subjectanalogy motor learningen_NZ
dc.subjectelectroencephalographyen_NZ
dc.subjectalpha poweren_NZ
dc.subjectalpha coherenceen_NZ
dc.subjectpsychomotor efficiencyen_NZ
dc.subjectTASK-PERFORMANCEen_NZ
dc.subjectDECISION-MAKINGen_NZ
dc.subjectTABLE-TENNISen_NZ
dc.subjectEEG ALPHAen_NZ
dc.subjectKNOW-HOWen_NZ
dc.subjectMOTORen_NZ
dc.subjectEXPLICITen_NZ
dc.subjectNOVICEen_NZ
dc.subjectSKILLen_NZ
dc.subjectEXPERTISEen_NZ
dc.titleAnalogy instructions promote efficiency of cognitive processes during hockey push-pass performanceen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/spy0000142en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfSport, Exercise, and Performance Psychologyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page7
pubs.elements-id227164
pubs.end-page20
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume8en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2157-3913en_NZ


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