Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.advisorWhite, Elizabeth Jayne
dc.contributor.advisorMurphy, Carol
dc.contributor.advisorCowie, Bronwen
dc.contributor.authorRedder, Bridgette Miriam
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-24T22:32:51Z
dc.date.available2019-02-24T22:32:51Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationRedder, B. (2019). Teacher pedagogy as an act of moral answerability: A self-study of an infant teacher’s answerable acts in infant pedagogy in New Zealand ECEC (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/12365en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12365
dc.description.abstractTypically, educational research considers how teachers are ethically accountable to learners, their families, teacher colleagues and society as a whole. But this thesis set out to explore the extent to which teachers are also morally accountable for their pedagogical acts. My route to such insight drew upon the notion of moral answerability (Bakhtin, 1993), which invites dialogic processes of meaning-making between (my) pedagogical acts from multiple standpoints across time and space. As an infant teacher myself, I selected a self-study method aligned with dialogic methodology in order to connect (my) self, others and pedagogical practices in consideration of infant practice. This thesis is therefore based on the premise that teacher pedagogy is an act of moral answerability. My self-study took place in a community based early childhood education and care (ECEC) service. Initially, I video recorded my practice engaging with infants which I took to separate staff meetings where footage was analysed by my teacher colleagues in dialogue with me. Subsequently, I analysed the staff meeting dialogue. Bakhtin’s notion of moral answerability was applied as the unit of analysis in order to analyse pedagogy as an act of moral answerability. Insights from (my) dialogic self-study have revealed that as an answerable self I have numerous accountabilities to different selves in relation to others. These accountabilities were evident in the way I exposed (my) answerable self in the dialogue, upheld the best interests of infants, ensured infants’ perspectives were taken into account, and was aware of not denying my subjectivity. The discovery that as a teacher I am an answerable self in relationship with others, summons a re-conceptualisation of professional identity as a plural concept. This challenges the traditional conceptualisation of professional identity as singular, in ownership of a defined set of assets valued by the teaching profession.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectmoral answerability
dc.subjectinfant pedagogy
dc.subjectmorality
dc.subjectdialogism
dc.subjectpedagogy
dc.subjectearly childhood education
dc.titleTeacher pedagogy as an act of moral answerability: A self-study of an infant teacher's answerable acts in infant pedagogy in New Zealand ECEC
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.updated2019-02-21T00:15:35Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record