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dc.contributor.authorHaring, Rodney C.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Whitney Annen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Mauien_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Elisa M.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTaualii, Maileen_NZ
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-27T23:50:11Z
dc.date.available2018-02en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-06-27T23:50:11Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHaring, R. C., Henry, W. A., Hudson, M., Rodriguez, E. M., & Taualii, M. (2018). Views on clinical trial recruitment, biospecimen collection, and cancer research: population science from landscapes of the Haudenosaunee (People of the Longhouse). Journal of Cancer Education, 33(1), 44–51. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-016-1067-5en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12647
dc.description.abstractBiomedical research in culturally distinct communities is often a challenge. Potential barriers to participation occur because science is presented in a format that lacks cultural acknowledgement. Investigations may also fail to showcase beneficial relevance to the communities or include them in true partnership. The history of biomedical research within Native American societies has been complicated by these issues. Historical trauma among many Native groups sometimes transcends into contemporary challenges in both recruitment to and participation particularly in biobanking research. The participants for this study included members of the Haudenosaunee, the People of the Longhouse. Native Americans, including the Haudenosaunee, endure some of the worst health disparities in the country. These include high rates of cancer, obesity, and diabetes which may be linked at least partially to genetic predisposition. Results from a Haudenosaunee urban population shared response on ways to improve recruitment strategies for biospecimen, cancer, and other health-related clinical trials. Mixed methods approaches were used, and community responses indicated the importance of creating trust through respectful partnership; promoting culturally appropriate recruitment materials; the need for a greater understanding of consenting and signature processes; the necessity for concise summary sheets; and a desire to have information that community member understand. Discussion items also include international Indigenous perspectives to biobanking and genetic-related health disparity research.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherSpringer US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen_NZ
dc.subjectBio-bankingen_NZ
dc.subjectBio-specimen researchen_NZ
dc.subjectCanceren_NZ
dc.subjectCancer educationen_NZ
dc.subjectCancer preventionen_NZ
dc.subjectClinical trialen_NZ
dc.subjectEthicsen_NZ
dc.subjectHaudenosauneeen_NZ
dc.subjectIroquoisen_NZ
dc.subjectMinorityen_NZ
dc.subjectNative Americanen_NZ
dc.subjectPatient communicationen_NZ
dc.subjectRecruitmenten_NZ
dc.titleViews on clinical trial recruitment, biospecimen collection, and cancer research: population science from landscapes of the Haudenosaunee (People of the Longhouse).en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13187-016-1067-5en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Cancer Educationen_NZ
pubs.begin-page44
pubs.elements-id215187
pubs.end-page51
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume33en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1543-0154en_NZ


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