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dc.contributor.advisorGill, Nicholas
dc.contributor.advisorDriller, Matthew W.
dc.contributor.authorPeta, Henare Te Ura Ote Ra
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-11T22:26:25Z
dc.date.available2019-07-11T22:26:25Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationPeta, H. T. U. O. R. (2019). The influence of velocity-based resistance training on strength and power development (Thesis, Master of Health, Sport and Human Performance (MHSHP)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/12700en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12700
dc.description.abstractSports that require high levels of strength and power typically employ traditional percentage-based training methods (%1RM). However, a major flaw to this form of training is that it does not take into account the athletes daily biological status and readiness to train. Therefore, movement velocity has been proposed as a viable method of resistance training to enhance performance. The purpose of this thesis was firstly, to examine literature on the adaptations and current practices of traditional based training (TT, %1RM) and velocity-based training methods (VBT). Secondly, to investigate the reliability of the bar mode application (band attached to the bar) of the PUSH band accelerometer in measuring peak velocity (PV) during the barbell squat jump exercises (SJ), and finally, to investigate the effects of VBT training on neuromuscular strength (back squat [BS], bench press, [BP]) and power (squat jump PV using the PUSH band) in comparison to TT (%1RM). The PUSH band showed high to perfect reliability in PVmax and PVmean across four trials (mean ICC 0.91 & 0.90). The results are in agreement with previous research conducted on the PUSH band accelerometer (when attached to the subject's forearm). No significant differences were found between groups in strength and power measures (p > 0.05). Furthermore, between-group effect sizes were deemed trivial for BS and BP (d = 0.00 and 0.03, respectively), while the effects for PVmax (d = 0.23 ±0.73) and PVmean (d = -0.38 ±0.59) were deemed unclear. Future research should focus on assessing the reliability of the bar mode application on other traditional exercises (BP, BS, deadlifts) at various intensities (20 – 90%1RM). Additionally, future research should utilise a larger sample size and a more homogenous strength/training group in order to determine any potential effects.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectTechnology
dc.subjectMovement velocity
dc.subjectAthlete Monitoring
dc.subjectStrength
dc.subjectPower
dc.subjectPushband
dc.titleThe influence of velocity-based resistance training on strength and power development
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health, Sport and Human Performance (MHSHP)
dc.date.updated2019-07-04T22:30:35Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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