Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorNorris, Adele N.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T04:28:41Z
dc.date.available2019-07-10en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-09-09T04:28:41Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationNorris, A. N. (2019). Interrelated struggles and the role of the academic in the fight for freedom. Journal of Global Indigeneity, 4(1).en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12848
dc.description.abstractProfessor Biko Agozino delivered the keynote address for the launch of the new journal Decolonisation of Criminology and Justice on the 7th June of this year. He began his talk recounting his earliest memories as a child survivor of the Nigerian Biafra War that occurred in 1967 to 1970. Specifically, he called attention to the critical role of intellectuals and academics, trained at top Universities, in facilitating the conflict that claimed millions of lives through bombings and starvation. Genocides of Indigenous peoples are still occurring and state-sanctioned violence (e.g., police brutality, mass imprisonment, criminal justice system, inadequate housing) is commonplace for Indigenous and Black peoples(Benson & Lewis 2019, Estes 2019, Kanem & Norris 2018, Ritchie 2017). Professor Agozino asked for us to reflect upon the place of the academy and the role of the scholar-activist in the struggles occurring all around us.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.urihttps://www.journalofglobalindigeneity.com/en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article is published in the Journal of Global Indigeneity. Used with permission.
dc.titleInterrelated struggles and the role of the academic in the fight for freedomen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Global Indigeneityen_NZ
pubs.elements-id238821
pubs.issue1en_NZ
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://www.journalofglobalindigeneity.com/en_NZ
pubs.volume4en_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record