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dc.contributor.authorAlvarez-Jimenez, Albertoen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T01:39:41Z
dc.date.available2019-08-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-10-15T01:39:41Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationAlvarez-Jimenez, A. (2019). The international law gaze: the ICJ strikes at colonialism. New Zealand Law Journal, 254–259.en
dc.identifier.issn0028-8373en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12957
dc.description.abstractThe International Court of Justice (the Court) rendered a few weeks ago a blow to the excesses of colonialism and its disdain for humanity in its advisory opinion (See Legal Consequences of the Separation of the Chagos Archipelago from Mauritius in 1965 (Advisory Opinion) [2019] (Chagos)). The advisory opinion deals with some dimensions of the right to self-determination and is of interest to New Zealand. The opinion is related to international law obligations New Zealand has as a result of its being administrator of Tokelau, and second, because the U.N Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is mentioned by two judges in their separate opinions (see Separate Opinion of Judge Cançado Trindade at [244] (Cançado Trindade) and Separate Opinion of Judge Robinson at [70(g)] (Robinson)).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLexisNexis NZ Ltden_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author's accepted manuscript of an article published in the journal New Zealand Law Journal. © 2019 LexisNexis NZ Ltd.
dc.titleThe international law gaze: the ICJ strikes at colonialismen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand Law Journalen_NZ
pubs.begin-page254
pubs.elements-id240483
pubs.end-page259


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