Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorRowe, Cassandraen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Brunoen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMialanes, Jeromeen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorUlm, Seanen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPetchey, Fionaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAird, Samantha J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMcNiven, Ian J.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLeavesley, Matthewen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Thomasen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T22:47:35Z
dc.date.available2019en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-10-21T22:47:35Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationRowe, C., David, B., Mialanes, J., Ulm, S., Petchey, F., Aird, S., … Richards, T. (2019). A Holocene record of savanna vegetation dynamics in southern lowland Papua New Guinea. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00334-019-00724-7en
dc.identifier.issn0939-6314en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/12995
dc.description.abstractThe southern lowlands of Papua New Guinea (PNG) are biogeographically distinct. Vast tracts of savanna vegetation occur there and yet most palaeoecological studies have focused on highlands and/or forest environments. Greater focus on long-term lowland environments provides a rare opportunity to understand and promote the significance of local and regional savannas, ultimately allowing non-forested and forested ecosystem dynamics to be compared. This paper examines palaeoecological and archaeological data from a lowland open savanna site situated on the south-central PNG coastline. The methods used incorporate pollen and micro-charcoal analyses, artefact recovery and sediment descriptions. We conclude with an environmental model of sedimentation and vegetation change for the past c. 5,800 years, revealing a mid to late Holocene savanna interchange between herbaceous and woody plant growth, with fluctuating fire occurrence increasing toward the present day. Increased silt deposition and modified regional hydrology are also recorded. Environmental changes correspond in timing with the start of permanent settlements and human use of fire. In particular, landscape burning for hunting and gardens for agriculture have helped create the open ecosystem still evident today.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00334-019-00724-7en_NZ
dc.rights© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019. This is the author's accepted version. The final publication is available at Springer via dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00334-019-00724-7
dc.subjectPapua New Guineaen_NZ
dc.subjectlowlanden_NZ
dc.subjectsavannaen_NZ
dc.subjectHoloceneen_NZ
dc.subjectpalaeoecologyen_NZ
dc.subjectarchaeologyen_NZ
dc.titleA Holocene record of savanna vegetation dynamics in southern lowland Papua New Guineaen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00334-019-00724-7en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfVegetation History and Archaeobotanyen_NZ
pubs.elements-id236619
dc.identifier.eissn1617-6278en_NZ


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record