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dc.contributor.authorOetzel, John G.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorScott, Ninaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHudson, Mauien_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMasters-Awatere, Bridgetteen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRarere, Moanaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFoote, Jeffen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBeaton, Angelaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorEhau, Terryen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-30T23:03:43Z
dc.date.available2018-01-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-10-30T23:03:43Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationOetzel, J., Scott, N., Hudson, M., Masters, B., Rarere, M., Foote, J., … Ehau, T. (2018). He Pikinga Waiora Implementation Framework: A tool for chronic disease intervention effectiveness in Maori and other indigenous communities. International Journal of Integrated Care, 18(S1). https://doi.org/10.5334/ijic.s1068en
dc.identifier.issn1568-4156en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13066
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Health outcomes for Māori are significantly worse than non-Maori in New Zealand; these inequities mirror those found in indigenous communities elsewhere. Evidence-based interventions with established efficacy may not be effective in indigenous communities without addressing specific implementation challenges. We present an implementation framework for chronic condition interventions for Māori. Theory/Methods: The He Pikinga Waiora Implementation Framework has indigenous self-determination at its core and consists of four elements: cultural-centeredness, community engagement, systems thinking, and integrated knowledge translation. All elements have demonstrated evidence of positive implementation outcomes. A coding scheme derived from the Framework was applied to 13 studies of diabetes prevention in indigenous communities from a systematic review. Results: Cross-tabulations demonstrated that culture-centeredness (p=.008) and community engagement (p=.009) explained differences in diabetes outcomes and community engagement (p=.098) explained difference in blood pressure outcomes. Discussion and Conclusions: The He Pikinga Waiora Implementation Framework is well suited to advance implementation science for Māori and other indigenous communities. The framework has promise as a policy and planning tool to evaluate and design effective interventions for chronic disease prevention. Lessons Learned: We needed to revise the coding framework in order to make the implication framework concrete. Limitations: This study has a limitation in that we coded information about interventions from the published articles and not the interventions themselves. Additionally, the study only included 13 interventions. Suggestions for Future Direction: Further research should provide stronger evidence of the usefulness of the framework particularly with Māori end-users. There will also be a need to understand the differential contribution of each of the four elements to health outcomes.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUBIQUITY PRESS LTDen_NZ
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectHealth Care Sciences & Servicesen_NZ
dc.subjectHealth Policy & Servicesen_NZ
dc.subjectcommunity-engaged researchen_NZ
dc.subjectsystems thinkingen_NZ
dc.subjectculture-centerednessen_NZ
dc.subjectintegrated knowledge translationen_NZ
dc.subjectimplementation scienceen_NZ
dc.titleHe Pikinga Waiora Implementation Framework: A tool for chronic disease intervention effectiveness in Maori and other indigenous communitiesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.5334/ijic.s1068en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfInternational Journal of Integrated careen_NZ
pubs.elements-id218855
pubs.issueS1
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume18en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noA68
uow.identifier.article-noA68


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