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dc.contributor.authorJay, Grace Mairi M.
dc.contributor.authorMorad, Munir
dc.contributor.authorBell, Angela
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-12T01:03:02Z
dc.date.available2008-11-12T01:03:02Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationJay, M., Morad, M. &Bell, A.(2003). Biosecurity, a policy dilemma for New Zealand. Land Use Policy, 20(2), 121-129.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/1308
dc.description.abstractProtection of New Zealand's native biodiversity and its primary production both depend on biosecurity measures to prevent invasion by alien, or exotic, organisms. At the same time, New Zealand's dependence on trade and travel in an increasingly globalised world places growing strain on the nation's biosecurity systems. Invasion by exotic species has potential for catastrophic impacts on both native biodiversity and human economic and social wellbeing. New Zealand's biosecurity policies have been gradually evolving from a narrow focus on production pests to a broader awareness of multiple economic, social and ecological objectives. This paper is about the process of reconciling conflicting objectives for biosecurity, with New Zealand as a case study example.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Science Ltden_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02648377en_US
dc.rightsThis is an author’s final version of an article published in the journal: Land Use Policy, (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.subjectbiodiversity conservation
dc.subjectbiological invasion
dc.subjectbiosecurity
dc.subjectenvironmental policy
dc.titleBiosecurity, a policy dilemma for New Zealanden_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0264-8377(03)00008-5en_US
dc.relation.isPartOfLand Use Policyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page121en_NZ
pubs.elements-id29329
pubs.end-page129en_NZ
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume20en_NZ


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