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dc.contributor.authorArcher, Stephen David Jamesen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kevin C.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCaruso, Tancredien_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMaki, Teruyaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLee, Charles K.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCarys, S. Craigen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Don A.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMaestre, Fernando T.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPointing, Stephen B.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T02:30:36Z
dc.date.available2019-06-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-12-02T02:30:36Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationArcher, S. D. J., Lee, K. C., Caruso, T., Maki, T., Lee, C. K., Carys, S. C., … Pointing, S. B. (2019). Airborne microbial transport limitation to isolated Antarctic soil habitats. Nature Microbiology, 4(6), 925–932. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-019-0370-4en
dc.identifier.issn2058-5276en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13245
dc.description.abstractDispersal is a critical yet poorly understood factor underlying macroecological patterns in microbial communities1. Airborne microbial transport is assumed to occupy a central role in determining dispersal outcomes2,3, and extra-range dispersal has important implications for predicting ecosystem resilience and response to environmental change4. One of the most pertinent biomes in this regard is Antarctica, given its geographic isolation and vulnerability to climate change and human disturbance5. Here, we report microbial diversity in near-ground and high-altitude air above the largest ice-free Antarctic habitat, as well as that of underlying soil microbial communities. We found that persistent local airborne inputs were unable to fully explain Antarctic soil community assembly. Comparison with airborne microbial diversity from high-altitude and non-polar sources suggests that strong selection occurs during long-range atmospheric transport. The influence of selection during airborne transit and at sink locations varied between microbial phyla. Overall, the communities from this isolated Antarctic ecosystem displayed limited connectivity to the non-polar microbial pool, and alternative sources of recruitment are necessary to fully explain extant soil diversity. Our findings provide critical insights into the role of airborne transport limitation in determining microbial biogeographic patterns.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Nature Microbiology. © 2019 Nature Publishing Group.
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_NZ
dc.subjectINTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACERen_NZ
dc.subjectBACTERIAL COMMUNITIESen_NZ
dc.subjectGLOBAL ATMOSPHEREen_NZ
dc.subjectFUNGALen_NZ
dc.subjectDIVERSITYen_NZ
dc.subjectNESTEDNESSen_NZ
dc.subjectDISPERSALen_NZ
dc.subjectLIFEen_NZ
dc.subjectTREEen_NZ
dc.titleAirborne microbial transport limitation to isolated Antarctic soil habitatsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41564-019-0370-4en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfNature Microbiologyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page925
pubs.elements-id235824
pubs.end-page932
pubs.issue6en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume4en_NZ


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