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dc.contributor.authorVeale, Jaimieen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T21:03:03Z
dc.date.available2016-04-01en_NZ
dc.date.available2019-12-09T21:03:03Z
dc.date.issued2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationVeale, J. (2016). Factorial validity and invariance assessment of a short version of the recalled childhood gender identity/role questionnaire. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45(3), 537–550. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-015-0684-0en
dc.identifier.issn0004-0002en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13285
dc.description.abstractRecalled childhood gender role/identity is a construct that is related to sexual orientation, abuse, and psychological health. The purpose of this study was to assess the factorial validity of a short version of Zucker et al.’s (2006) “Recalled Childhood Gender Identity/Gender Role Questionnaire” using confirmatory factor analysis and to test the stability of the factor structure across groups (measurement invariance). Six items of the questionnaire were completed online by 1929 participants from a variety of gender identity and sexual orientation groups. Models of the six items loading onto one factor had poor fit for the data. Items were removed for having a large proportion of error variance. Among birth-assigned females, a five-item model had good fit for the data, but there was evidence for differences in scale’s factor structure across gender identity, age, level of education, and country groups. Among birth-assigned males, the resulting four-item model did not account for all of the relationship between variables, and modeling for this resulted in a model that was almost saturated. This model also had evidence of measurement variance across gender identity and sexual orientation groups. The models had good reliability and factor score determinacy. These findings suggest that results of previous studies that have assessed recalled childhood gender role/identity may have been susceptible to construct bias due to measurement variance across these groups. Future studies should assess measurement invariance between groups they are comparing, and if it is not found the issue can be addressed by removing variant indicators and/or applying a partial invariance model.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherSpringeren_NZ
dc.rights© 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10508-015-0684-0
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinicalen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial Sciences, Interdisciplinaryen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychologyen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial Sciences - Other Topicsen_NZ
dc.subjectGender identityen_NZ
dc.subjectGender roleen_NZ
dc.subjectSexual orientationen_NZ
dc.subjectConfirmatory factor analysisen_NZ
dc.subjectMeasurement invarianceen_NZ
dc.subjectCONFIRMATORY FACTOR-ANALYSISen_NZ
dc.subjectTESTING MEASUREMENT INVARIANCEen_NZ
dc.subjectSEXUAL ORIENTATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectNONCONFORMITYen_NZ
dc.subjectGAYen_NZ
dc.subjectADOLESCENTSen_NZ
dc.subjectBEHAVIORen_NZ
dc.subjectVICTIMIZATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectEQUIVALENCEen_NZ
dc.subjectCOVARIANCEen_NZ
dc.titleFactorial validity and invariance assessment of a short version of the recalled childhood gender identity/role questionnaireen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10508-015-0684-0en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfArchives of Sexual Behavioren_NZ
pubs.begin-page537
pubs.elements-id137403
pubs.end-page550
pubs.issue3en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume45en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2800en_NZ


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