Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.authorYong, Amyen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Maree A.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Annaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-14T20:50:07Z
dc.date.available2019en_NZ
dc.date.available2020-01-14T20:50:07Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationYong, A., Roche, M. A., & Sutton, A. (2019). Supervisory skills training for the neglected supervisors: development and preliminary evaluation of an autonomy-supportive programme. Industrial and Commercial Training, 51(5), 315–326. https://doi.org/10.1108/ict-01-2019-0013en
dc.identifier.issn0019-7858en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13371
dc.description.abstractPurpose Previous studies have demonstrated that an autonomy-supportive supervision style is associated with improved well-being and positive behaviours for supervisees. However, autonomy-supportive training (AST) has yet to be tailored to suit supervisors in low-skilled occupations for whom traditional pedagogical approaches may be inappropriate. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and preliminary evaluation of AST for these supervisors, using self-determination theory (SDT) and andragogical principles of adult learning. Design/methodology/approach SDT and andragogical principles were systematically integrated to develop (a 3 h) AST programme. The training sessions were trialled with 11 first-line supervisors in New Zealand as a preliminary evaluation of AST. The evaluation used open-ended questions following Kirkpatrick’s evaluation model and incorporated the trainer’s reflections. Findings Supervisors found AST relevant, easy to understand and suited to their approach to learning. Trainer’s reflections also provided insight into the challenges in conducting such training for supervisors in low-skilled occupations and the article makes suggestions to address these challenges. Research limitations/implications AST can be successfully tailored to first-line supervisors, indicating that an autonomy-supportive style of leadership is relevant for those employed in low-skilled occupations. This initial evaluation provides a foundation for future studies to conduct higher-level assessment of AST. Practical implications AST can be utilised to provide first-line supervisors with access to improved leadership development opportunities. Challenges of conducting this kind of training programme in a context of low-skilled occupations are addressed and recommendations made for organisations and trainers. Originality/value This study is novel as it demonstrates the development of AST, a leadership skills training, tailored to suit the needs of an understudied group, supervisors in low-skilled occupations.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherEmeralden_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Industrial and Commercial Training. © 2019 Emerald Publishing Limited.
dc.subjectAndragogy
dc.subjectAutonomy-supportive style
dc.subjectLeadership skills training
dc.subjectLow-skilled occupations
dc.titleSupervisory skills training for the neglected supervisors: development and preliminary evaluation of an autonomy-supportive programmeen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/ict-01-2019-0013en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfIndustrial and Commercial Trainingen_NZ
pubs.begin-page315
pubs.elements-id238202
pubs.end-page326
pubs.issue5en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_NZ
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/ICT-01-2019-0013/full/htmlen_NZ
pubs.volume51en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noICT-01-2019-0013


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record