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dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Angelika
dc.contributor.authorHumphrey-Rush, Amanda Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-27T00:34:42Z
dc.date.available2020-03-27T00:34:42Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationHumphrey-Rush, A. M. (2020). Does Video Priming and Video Modelling help to reduce anxiety and increase social behaviours for adults who have a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder or Intellectual Disability when starting paid employment? (Thesis, Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/13529en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13529
dc.description.abstractEmployment rates for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Intellectual Disability (ID) are much lower than the general population. Social skill difficulties and experiences with anxiety are thought to be contributing factors to this low employment rate. This study incorporated two Video-based Interventions (VBI’s), Video Priming (VP) and Video Modelling (VM), to address anxiety and social skill difficulties for 2 adults with disabilities who were starting work in a supported employment service. Both participants were adult males, one of whom had an ASD diagnosis, and the other who had an ID diagnosis. VP was used to provide a preview of the expected events at the beginning of the first day at work, in an attempt to reduce anxiety associated with starting a new job. Anxiety levels of the participant who did receive VP were compared to those of the participant who did not receive VP. Results showed a decrease in anxiety for the participant who received the VP intervention and suggested that VP may improve experiences of anxiety for people with ID and ASD who are starting a new job. VM was implemented in this study to teach target social behaviours to participants, with an aim of increasing these behaviours. Results for each participant showed increases in many, but not all, of the target social behaviours, but these increases were not maintained over time and returned to baseline levels. Overall, this research provides support for VBI’s as an intervention to reduce challenges such as anxiety and social skill deficits for adults with ASD and ID starting work. Recommendations have been made in regard to conducting further research to continue exploring the use of VP to reduce anxiety relating to starting as this is a developing area of information, and where adjustments can be made to the VM intervention to further evaluate the effectiveness of this.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectautism
dc.subjectintellectual disbaility
dc.subjectemployment
dc.subjectvideo modelling
dc.subjectvideo priming
dc.subjectvideo-based interventions
dc.subjectsocial skills
dc.subjectanxiety
dc.titleDoes Video Priming and Video Modelling help to reduce anxiety and increase social behaviours for adults who have a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder or Intellectual Disability when starting paid employment?
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
dc.date.updated2020-03-26T23:20:35Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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