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dc.contributor.authorAnton, Andreaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRandle, Janna L.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Francisca C.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRossbach, Susannen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Joanne I.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWeinzierl, Michaelen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-17T00:06:12Z
dc.date.available2020-07-17T00:06:12Z
dc.date.issued2020en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationAnton, A., Randle, J. L., Garcia, F. C., Rossbach, S., Ellis, J., Weinzierl, M., & Duarte, C. M. (2020). Differential thermal tolerance between algae and corals may trigger the proliferation of algae in coral reefs. Global Change Biology, 26(8), 4316–4327. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15141en
dc.identifier.issn1354-1013en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13677
dc.description.abstractMarine heatwaves can lead to rapid changes in entire communities, including in the case of shallow coral reefs the potential overgrowth of algae. Here we tested experimentally the differential thermal tolerance between algae and coral species from the Red Sea through the measurement of thermal performance curves and the assessment of thermal limits. Differences across functional groups (algae vs corals) were apparent for two key thermal performance metrics. First, two reef-associated algae species (Halimeda tuna and Turbinaria ornata,) had higher lethal thermal limits than two coral species (Pocillopora verrucosa and Stylophora pistillata) conferring those species of algae with a clear advantage during heatwaves by surpassing the thermal threshold of coral survival. Second, the coral species had generally greater deactivation energies for net and gross primary production rates compared to the algae species, indicating greater thermal sensitivity in corals once the optimum temperature is exceeded. Our field surveys in the Red Sea reefs before and after the marine heatwave of 2015 show a change in benthic cover mainly in the southern reefs, where there was a decrease in coral cover and a concomitant increase in algae abundance, mainly turf algae. Our laboratory and field observations indicate that a proliferation of algae might be expected on Red Sea coral reefs with future ocean warming.
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWileyen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author's accepted version of an article published in Global Change Biology. © 2020 Wiley.
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectBiodiversity conservationen_NZ
dc.subjectEcologyen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectBiodiversity & Conservationen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental sciences & ecologyen_NZ
dc.subjectHeatwavesen_NZ
dc.subjectRed Seaen_NZ
dc.subjectThermal limitsen_NZ
dc.subjectThermal vulnerabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectTurf algaeen_NZ
dc.subjectLarge-scale degradationen_NZ
dc.subjectClimate changeen_NZ
dc.subjectPhase shiftsen_NZ
dc.subjectAcidificationen_NZ
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_NZ
dc.subjectCommunitiesen_NZ
dc.subjectTemperatureen_NZ
dc.subjectAdaptationen_NZ
dc.subjectScenariosen_NZ
dc.titleDifferential thermal tolerance between algae and corals may trigger the proliferation of algae in coral reefsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/gcb.15141en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfGlobal Change Biologyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page4316
pubs.elements-id252912
pubs.end-page4327
pubs.issue8
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume26
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2486en_NZ


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