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dc.contributor.authorHaughton, Grahamen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Iainen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-21T04:27:39Z
dc.date.available2020-09-21T04:27:39Z
dc.date.issued2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHaughton, G., & White, I. (2018). Risky spaces: Creating, contesting and communicating lines on environmental hazard maps. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 43(3), 435–448. https://doi.org/10.1111/tran.12227en
dc.identifier.issn0020-2754en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13838
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the tensions involved in the production, presentation and revision of hazard maps, focusing on the controversies that have become increasingly common when they are used to change government policy. Our scope includes all the major environmental hazards currently being mapped in New Zealand, one of the world's most exposed and hazard‐aware countries. Selecting one country also allowed a multi‐hazard approach to be taken that helps provide messages for other countries. Drawing on interviews with 24 key informants, the paper identifies a range of reasons for explaining the recent growth in hazard mapping and why hazard maps sometimes resulted in high‐profile controversies. Two themes emerged out of this analysis: an inconsistency in modelling and mapping hazards that created opportunity for challenge and the selective mobilisation of scientific uncertainty to dispute the legitimacy of official maps, particularly on developed land. The findings highlight the multiple roles of mapping, positioning maps as potentially instruments of both depoliticisation and repoliticisation. We emphasise how conflicts are most likely when maps are used as technocratic instruments of depoliticisation, and that creating maps in a more open way can generate valuable opportunities to engage with communities in more creative policy‐making regarding the threats they face and how they can respond. Mapping processes that open up the space for critical debate can act as important debate‐support tools as well as decision‐support tools, particularly when used to give voice to those not normally heard or treated as equal.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWileyen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The information, practices and views in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). © 2017 The Authors. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectGeographyen_NZ
dc.subjectenvironmental hazardsen_NZ
dc.subjectknowledge controversiesen_NZ
dc.subjectmapsen_NZ
dc.subjectplanningen_NZ
dc.subjectrisken_NZ
dc.subjectuncertaintyen_NZ
dc.subjectFLOOD RISKen_NZ
dc.subjectCLIMATE-CHANGEen_NZ
dc.subjectMANAGEMENTen_NZ
dc.subjectPOLITICSen_NZ
dc.subjectUNCERTAINTYen_NZ
dc.subjectINFORMATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectCARTOGRAPHYen_NZ
dc.subjectEXPERTISEen_NZ
dc.subjectSEARCHen_NZ
dc.subjectCITYen_NZ
dc.titleRisky spaces: Creating, contesting and communicating lines on environmental hazard mapsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/tran.12227en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfTransactions of the Institute of British Geographersen_NZ
pubs.begin-page435
pubs.elements-id209695
pubs.end-page448
pubs.issue3en_NZ
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume43en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1475-5661en_NZ


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