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dc.contributor.authorWhite, Iainen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNandedkar, Gaurien_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-21T23:14:09Z
dc.date.available2020-09-21T23:14:09Z
dc.date.issued2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWhite, I., & Nandedkar, G. (2019). The housing crisis as an ideological artefact: Analysing how political discourse defines, diagnoses, and responds. Housing Studies. https://doi.org/10.1080/02673037.2019.1697801en
dc.identifier.issn0267-3037en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/13840
dc.description.abstractIt is a truism that politicians from countries around the world claim to be in the midst of a ‘housing crisis’. But how do they define it, who is affected, and what is the cause? This paper provides a critical evaluation of the emergence and scope of political discourse connected to the housing crisis in New Zealand under three National Party led governments (2008-2017), with a view to better understanding the ways in which the issue has been problematized in politics and operationalized in policy. It finds that although researchers draw upon multiple strands of evidence and recognize housing as a complex problem, the political framing of a housing crisis is simpler and shows a closer relationship to long standing ideological perspectives, notably an inefficient planning system and low supply of development land. This raises critical questions for how housing researchers can better influence politics and challenge both the lived experience of crisis and existing claims of normalcy.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_NZ
dc.rights© 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectRegional & Urban Planningen_NZ
dc.subjectUrban Studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences & Ecologyen_NZ
dc.subjectPublic Administrationen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectcrisisen_NZ
dc.subjecthousingen_NZ
dc.subjectpolicyen_NZ
dc.subjectaffordabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectplanningen_NZ
dc.subjectCLIMATE-CHANGE ADAPTATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectCOMPETING FRAMESen_NZ
dc.subjectCONSTRUCTIONen_NZ
dc.subjectPOLICYen_NZ
dc.subjectMATTERen_NZ
dc.subjectISSUEen_NZ
dc.titleThe housing crisis as an ideological artefact: Analysing how political discourse defines, diagnoses, and respondsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02673037.2019.1697801en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfHousing Studiesen_NZ
pubs.elements-id250118
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn1466-1810en_NZ


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