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dc.contributor.authorMayo, Michael
dc.coverage.spatialConference held at Adelaide, Australiaen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-19T03:22:40Z
dc.date.available2008-11-19T03:22:40Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationMayo, M. (2003). Symbol grounding and its implications for artificial intelligence. In Proceedings of the twenty-sixth Australasian computer science conference on Conference in research and practice in information technology, Adelaide, Australia (pp. 55-60). Darlinghurst, Australia: Australian Computer Society, Inc.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/1391
dc.description.abstractIn response to Searle's well-known Chinese room argument against Strong AI (and more generally, computationalism), Harnad proposed that if the symbols manipulated by a robot were sufficiently grounded in the real world, then the robot could be said to literally understand. In this article, I expand on the notion of symbol groundedness in three ways. Firstly, I show how a robot might select the best set of categories describing the world, given that fundamentally continuous sensory data can be categorised in an almost infinite number of ways. Secondly, I discuss the notion of grounded abstract (as opposed to concrete) concepts. Thirdly, I give an objective criterion for deciding when a robot's symbols become sufficiently grounded for "understanding" to be attributed to it. This deeper analysis of what symbol groundedness actually is weakens Searle's position in significant ways; in particular, whilst Searle may be able to refute Strong AI in the specific context of present-day digital computers, he cannot refute computationalism in general.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAustralia: Australian Computer Society, Inc. Darlinghurst, Australiaen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://crpit.com/abstracts/CRPITV16Mayo.htmlen_US
dc.rightsThis is an author’s version of an article published in Proceedings of the twenty-sixth Australasian computer science conference on Conference in research and practice in information technology. Copyring © 2003. Australian Computer Society, Inc.en_US
dc.sourceACSC2003en_NZ
dc.subjectcomputer scienceen_US
dc.subjectChinese room argumenten_US
dc.subjectsymbol groundingen_US
dc.subjectartificial intelligenceen_US
dc.titleSymbol grounding and its implications for artificial intelligenceen_US
dc.typeConference Contributionen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfProc 26th Australasian Computer Science Conferenceen_NZ
pubs.begin-page55en_NZ
pubs.elements-id13224
pubs.end-page60en_NZ
pubs.finish-date2003en_NZ
pubs.start-date2003en_NZ
pubs.volumeCRPIT 16en_NZ


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