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dc.contributor.advisorPolaschek, Devon
dc.contributor.authorTomkins, Jordan
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-01T20:34:47Z
dc.date.available2021-03-01T20:34:47Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationTomkins, J. (2020). High-risk victims of intimate partner violence within the Integrated Safety Response pilot: An examination of psychosocial stressors and repeat victimisation (Thesis, Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/14141en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14141
dc.description.abstractIntimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious social issue in Aotearoa New Zealand, especially for victims at high risk of experiencing ongoing harm–or even death–as a result of IPV. Yet there is relatively limited empirical research that quantifies the stressors faced by high-risk victims, nor investigates whether these factors predict IPV recurrence. Using Dutton’s (2006) nested ecological theory to frame this longitudinal study, we examined 165 high-risk IPV cases from the Integrated Safety Response (ISR) pilot. With a primary focus on victims, we manually coded 39 baseline variables across the individual, relationship and community ecological levels; recorded initial engagement with ISR interventions; and examined IPV recurrence reported to police during the 12-month follow up. Results demonstrated that extensive stressors were experienced by these victims and that most victims had at least one IPV recurrence reported to police during follow up. Whilst only a modest number of variables significantly predicted IPV recurrence, physical IPV recurrence or offence detection; we identified that nonfatal strangulation, victim fear, relationship status and the victim’s initial engagement with ISR interventions all uniquely predicted these outcome measures across multivariate analyses. Theoretically, we found empirical support for Dutton’s (2006) nested ecological framework, although the explanatory mechanisms for the four key predictors need to be examined in future research. Practically, improved awareness of high-risk victims’ needs can guide collaborative support responses and, among a group with several possible risk factors, identifying predictors of repeat victimisation can inform risk assessments and prevention strategies for high-risk IPV cases. Finally, we consider limitations of the current research and make several important recommendations for future research.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.lcshMedical care, Cost of -- New Zealand -- Waikato -- Analysis
dc.titleHigh-risk victims of intimate partner violence within the Integrated Safety Response pilot: An examination of psychosocial stressors and repeat victimisation
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Social Sciences (MSocSc)
dc.date.updated2021-02-24T20:10:35Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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