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dc.contributor.authorTan, Kyle K.H.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorYee, Asheen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorVeale, Jaimieen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-23T02:23:17Z
dc.date.available2021-06-23T02:23:17Z
dc.date.issued2021en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationTan, K. K. H., Yee, A., & Veale, J. (2021). ‘Being trans intersects with my cultural identity’: Social determinants of mental health among Asian transgender people. Transgender Health. https://doi.org/10.1089/trgh.2021.0007en
dc.identifier.issn2688-4887en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14401
dc.description.abstractPurpose: While studies on the relationship between social determinants and mental health among transgender people in Asia are increasing, there is a paucity of research on Asian transgender people living in Western countries. This study aimed to examine how social positions (gender, ethnicity, and migrant status) and social determinants of mental health were inter-related for Asian transgender people in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Methods: We analyzed both quantitative and qualitative data from Asian participants (n=49) who responded to the 2018 Counting Ourselves: Aotearoa New Zealand Trans and Non-Binary Health Survey. Results: Overall, 35% reported a very high psychological distress level. There were high levels of unmet needs for gender-affirming care, and participants reported a range of negative experiences at health care settings. About two-fifths had been discriminated because of their transgender (42%) or Asian (39%) identities. Fewer than half of participants felt that their family members were supportive of them being transgender (44%), and most reported they had supportive friends (73%). More than two-thirds of participants (68%) had a strong sense of belongingness to the transgender community and 35% reported this for the Asian community. Qualitative findings revealed specific challenges that participants experienced; these included barriers to accessing health care due to their migrant status and language barriers, influences of Asian cultures on mental health experiences, and rejection by family and people in Asian communities. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence for health care providers, researchers, and policy makers to employ a culturally appropriate lens to improve knowledge about the intersectional experiences of being Asian and transgender.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Incen_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an author’s accepted version of an article published in the journal: Transgender Health. Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/trgh.2021.0007
dc.subjectSocial Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinicalen_NZ
dc.subjectPublic, Environmental & Occupational Healthen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial Sciences, Biomedicalen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychologyen_NZ
dc.subjectBiomedical Social Sciencesen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial determinantsen_NZ
dc.subjectmental healthen_NZ
dc.subjectAsianen_NZ
dc.subjecttransgenderen_NZ
dc.subjectmigranten_NZ
dc.subjectNEW-ZEALANDen_NZ
dc.subjectSUICIDAL IDEATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectGENDER IDENTITYen_NZ
dc.subjectATTITUDESen_NZ
dc.subjectCAREen_NZ
dc.subjectRISKen_NZ
dc.title"Being trans intersects with my cultural identity": Social determinants of mental health among Asian transgender peopleen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/trgh.2021.0007en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfTransgender Healthen_NZ
pubs.elements-id261203
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2380-193Xen_NZ


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