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dc.contributor.authorChepulis, Lynne Merranen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMorison, Brittanyen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCassim, Shemanaen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNorman, Kimberleyen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKeenan, Rawirien_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Ryan G.en_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLawrenson, Rossen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-10T01:24:34Z
dc.date.available2021-08-10T01:24:34Z
dc.date.issued2021en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationChepulis, L. M., Morison, B., Cassim, S., Norman, K., Keenan, R., Paul, R. G., & Lawrenson, R. (2021). Barriers to diabetes self-management in a subset of New Zealand adults with Type 2 diabetes and poor glycaemic control. Journal of Diabetes Research, 2021, Article 5531146. https://doi.org/10.1155/2021/5531146en
dc.identifier.issn2314-6745en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14521
dc.description.abstractBackground. Despite the fact that there is an increasingly effective armoury of medications to treat diabetes, many people continue to have substantially elevated blood glucose levels. The purpose of this study was to explore what the barriers to diabetes management are in a cohort of people with diabetes and poor glycaemic control. Methods. Qualitative semistructured interviews were carried out with 10 people with diabetes who had known diabetes and a recent HbA1c of >11.3% (100 mmol/mol) to explore their experiences of barriers to diabetes self-management and glycaemic control. Results. Barriers to diabetes management were based around two key themes: biopsychosocial factors and knowledge about diabetes. Specifically, financial concerns, social stigma, medication side effects, and cognitive impairment due to hyperglycaemia were commonly reported as barriers to medication use. Other barriers included a lack of knowledge about their own condition, poor relationships with healthcare professionals, and a lack of relevant resources to support diet and weight loss. Conclusion. People with diabetes with poor glycaemic control experience many of the same barriers as those reported elsewhere, but also experience issues specifically related to their severe hyperglycaemia. Management of diabetes could be improved via the increased use of patient education and availability of locally relevant resources.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherHindawi Ltden_NZ
dc.rights© 2021 Lynne Chepulis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.subjectScience & Technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicineen_NZ
dc.subjectEndocrinology & Metabolismen_NZ
dc.subjectMedicine, Research & Experimentalen_NZ
dc.subjectResearch & Experimental Medicineen_NZ
dc.subjectPRIMARY-CAREen_NZ
dc.subjectCOGNITIVE IMPAIRMENTen_NZ
dc.subjectMEDICATION ADHERENCEen_NZ
dc.subjectSUPPORTen_NZ
dc.subjectINTERVENTIONen_NZ
dc.subjectBEHAVIORSen_NZ
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_NZ
dc.subjectPEOPLESen_NZ
dc.titleBarriers to diabetes self-management in a subset of New Zealand adults with Type 2 diabetes and poor glycaemic controlen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2021/5531146en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Diabetes Researchen_NZ
pubs.elements-id262187
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_NZ
pubs.volume2021en_NZ
dc.identifier.eissn2314-6753en_NZ
uow.identifier.article-noARTN 5531146


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