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dc.contributor.advisorNeilson, David
dc.contributor.advisorKingsbury, Justine
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Darelle Jane
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-19T23:54:32Z
dc.date.available2021-08-19T23:54:32Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationHoward, D. J. (2021). Bringing regulation to the fore of food regime theory: The neoliberal model of development in agriculture and beyond in theory and practice (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/14534en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14534
dc.description.abstractThis thesis works to bring in a critically revised version of regulation theory in order to address impasses in food regime theory. This theoretical innovation enables me to identify McMichael’s (2005; 2009a; 2009b; 2013) third food regime as the neoliberal model of development in agriculture (NMD in agriculture); and also discuss a possible democratic, counter-hegemonic post-neoliberal model of development in agriculture. The development of this conceptual framework enables the identification of regime and regulatory aspects particular to this neoliberal capitalist era. That is, this thesis develops a mid-range perspective that enables more specific critique of the present neoliberal era pivoting around regulation and regime. This presents an innovative take on this particular temporal plot of the Anthropocene. There is a tendency to investigate capitalism as a homogenous history, however, this invisibilises demarcations across this history identifying distinct eras. Noting these distinctions facilitates a more thorough critique of each period. It is what distinguishes these mid-range eras that is the key to this project. I suggest that this is different regulatory architectures and different national and transnational regimes of accumulation, more specifically, different models of development. In particular, I conceptualise the effect that regulation has on our food regimes of accumulation. I investigate existing agricultural practices and ways of life that provide an alternative to dominant forms of agriculture. Employing a revised regulation theory, I consider the link between agricultural practices (emerging in regimes of accumulation) and regulation in the present era. Furthermore, I consider how food regimes of accumulation could be regulated differently in the future in the name of environmental and social justice. In sum, this thesis conceptualises the defining food regime of accumulation and regulatory architecture of the neoliberal era defined as the neoliberal model of development in agriculture, and considers how we might conceptualise the next post-neoliberal era. This research focus is underpinned by a motive to engage the agency of numerous groups at various levels, from the community, to the national, to the transnational, to actively conceptualise the next era of capitalism. It is a cry to attend to the crises of the prevailing neoliberal era and actively engage in a praxis approach that is grounded in theory informing practice and change. That is, let us theorise the contemporary, thoroughly conceptualise it as a marked era, and attempt to address the failings of this era in the conceptualisation of the next era that is premised on the (not yet seen) subordination of capital.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectRegulation
dc.subjectModel of development
dc.subjectModel of development in agriculture
dc.subjectFood regime
dc.subjectNeoliberal
dc.subjectConventional agriculture
dc.subjectAlternative agriculture
dc.subjectMid-range
dc.subjectPraxis
dc.subject.lcshFood industry and trade -- Economic aspects -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshAgriculture -- Social aspects -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshProduce trade -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshAgriculture and state -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshNeoliberalism -- New Zealand
dc.titleBringing regulation to the fore of food regime theory: The neoliberal model of development in agriculture and beyond in theory and practice
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.updated2021-08-08T22:50:35Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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