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dc.contributor.advisorBarbour, Karen
dc.contributor.authorRichmond, Courtney J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-08T02:13:44Z
dc.date.available2021-12-08T02:13:44Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/14682
dc.description.abstractInclusive dance practice is based upon the assumption that dancing is a fundamental activity that all people may participate in. It is a practice that brings diverse groups of people together to share in the movement of dance and is built upon core values that differ from traditional dance practice. The core values that underpin and drive inclusive dance practice are: inclusion, community building, and the celebration of diversity. Inclusive dance practice encompasses diversity both in the people engaging in dance and in the ways in which different community members move together. This thesis focuses on the ways in which key experts of inclusive dance work within the roles of leader, teacher, facilitator within their community. Developing a deeper understanding of inclusive dance practice, and of leadership, pedagogy and facilitation within research literature provides the context for an ethnographic investigation into how inclusive dance communities and key experts engage. Interviews with four key experts in inclusive dance in New Zealand, along with participant observation and field notes gathered as an insider researcher within the community of Wellington Inclusive Dance (WI Dance) are analysed and provide rich ethnographic narrative and autoethnographic vignettes. These findings offer insights into the core values from which inclusive dance arises and informs the practices within different communities while still allowing for multiplicity and uniqueness. These values promoted through inclusive dance mean that the learning experiences within inclusive dance classes are presented in non-traditional ways, allowing key experts to work in various ways including as leader, teacher and/or facilitator. In particular, transformational leadership, student-centred and somatic pedagogies, and facilitation as a pedagogical approach, are utilised by the key experts. On the basis of this research, it is concluded that the key experts role in an inclusive dance community is fluid and multifaceted as they adapt to address the needs of the community and uphold the core values of the practice. In order to meet the diverse needs of the community, key experts use leadership, pedagogy and facilitation approaches in unique ways as appropriate for them and their community. This shows that an understanding of the values underpinning inclusive dance practice is essential for understanding the ways in which leadership, pedagogy and facilitation approaches are used by key experts in inclusive dance communities.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectDance
dc.subjectInclusive
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectLeadership
dc.subjectPedagogy
dc.subjectFacilitation
dc.subjectInclusive dance
dc.subject.lcshDance -- Study and teaching -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshMovement education -- Study and teaching -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshInclusive education -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshLeadership -- New Zealand
dc.subject.lcshDance -- Social aspects -- New Zealand
dc.titleUnderstanding inclusive dance practice: An investigation of the leadership, pedagogy and facilitation in inclusive dance classes in Aotearoa, New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)
dc.date.updated2021-12-02T07:35:36Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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